William Starke Rosecrans

5fish

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That source only lists Irish regiments.
Here is a overview...


The Irish Brigade suffered the third-highest number of battlefield casualties of any Union brigade. Of the 7,715 men who served in its ranks, 961 were killed or mortally wounded, and approximately 3,000 were wounded. The number of casualties was more men than ever served in its ranks at any one time. As a testament to the Irishmen’s bravery, 11 of the unit’s members were awarded the Medal of Honor.


Although replacements and supplemental regiments would refill the ranks, the uniquely Irish nature of the Brigade died there on the Wheatfield at Gettysburg.

A comparison of units are...

 

Jim Klag

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Here is a overview...


The Irish Brigade suffered the third-highest number of battlefield casualties of any Union brigade. Of the 7,715 men who served in its ranks, 961 were killed or mortally wounded, and approximately 3,000 were wounded. The number of casualties was more men than ever served in its ranks at any one time. As a testament to the Irishmen’s bravery, 11 of the unit’s members were awarded the Medal of Honor.


Although replacements and supplemental regiments would refill the ranks, the uniquely Irish nature of the Brigade died there on the Wheatfield at Gettysburg.

A comparison of units are...

So being the brigade with the third highest casualriss means there was a conspiracy to use them as cannon fodder? What must the two brigades with more casualties think? Those darn Republicans are trying to kill off all the farmers?
 

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Rosecrans's big mistake when fighting and defeating Bragg and pushing him into Georgia was not trying to destroy Braggs army. He wanted to secure land gains. He seem to miss the point Grant and Lee understood. It was not about conquering land but about destroying the other guy's army...


Despite heavy pressure from President Lincoln, Rosecrans refrained from advancing for the next six months. Finally, in late June, Rosecrans began a well-executed offensive that forced the Confederates to abandon the vital city of Chattanooga, Tennessee and retreat into Georgia. Nonetheless, Bragg’s army remained intact, as Rosecrans focused on capturing territory rather than destroying enemy forces. On September 19 and 20, Bragg struck back near Chickamauga Creek. In one of the few battles in which the Union was outnumbered, the Confederate Army of Tennessee delivered a crushing blow to the Army of the Cumberland, sending Rosecrans fleeing back to Chattanooga, where federal forces were quickly besieged.
 

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Oh, Rosecran's other mistake was pissing off Grant at the Battle of Second Corinth. It was Rosecrans acolytes that went after Grant first after the Battle of Luka... I admit Grant was not much help to Rosecrans in the Battle of Luka because of acoustic shadow.
 

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Rosencrans try to get the Mexicans to build a railroad...


El General W.S. Rosecrans y el Ferrocarril de Tuxpan al Pacifico
Mexico City: Imprenta Dirigida por Jose Batiza, 1870. 36pp. Original plain green wrappers. Wrappers with wear and substantial chipping. Minor soiling and wear to text. Very good. Item #2076

Mexican pamphlet compiling arguments of W.S. Rosecrans in favor of a railway line through Mexico. Rosecrans, a Union general during the Civil War, was involved with the Southern Pacific Railroad after the war, though he lost the investments due to poor choice in business partners. He subsequently served briefly as U.S. Minister to Mexico (1868-1869), and while there became convinced that Mexico would greatly benefit from a narrow gauge rail line and telegraph from Tampico to the coast. He pursued this for several years (1869-1873), but the project was ultimately a failure. This is an early booster work for the project. Scarce, with fewer than ten copies in OCLC.
 

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Rosecrans was an ill-tempered man but not before the troops it seems...


The differences between the leadership styles of Buell and Rosecrans could hardly be more pronounced. Buell, despite his competence and recognized ability at organization, came across to his volunteer soldiers as a haughty, stiff, humorless West Pointer, unapproachable, and unpopular. Rosecrans, as the following accounts will show, made a point of holding reviews of his troops so that he could see them firsthand and gauge their tenor and condition, but also so that he could infuse his spirit and energy into the ranks. Likewise, the men enjoyed being able to lay eyes on their commander, something that rarely if ever happened while Buell had command. Overall, the men came away liking Rosecrans; he was viewed as earnest, highly intelligent, chatty, and down to earth. And the Army of Ohio, surly after the less than spectacular results of the Kentucky campaign, was an army in need of morale boosting and in this respect Rosecrans, like George McClellan, truly excelled.
 
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