1856 - Battle at Osawatomie, Kansas

5fish

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It was more than 12 free-staters.... but not many more... Here a nice site about the raucous...


snip... john Brown had his own park...

“On the morning of August 30, 1856, John Brown led about 30 anti-slavery men into battle against 250 proslavery Missourians. The Battle of Osawatomie raged on the site of John Brown Memorial Park.”

snip... it was about 40 men...

“Local tradition maintains that the statue of John Brown is located where the mounted proslavery men fired their first shots. Brown positioned his men about four hundred yards to the north in the timber lining the south bank of the Marais des Cygnes River. The Missourians charged down the hill toward Brown's men with their guns blazing. The free-state force held firm, checking the first charge. The attackers dismounted, outflanked Brown's force, and brought their cannon into action.


snip...

“Finally Brown and his men bolted from their hiding places and fled across the river. The Missourians swarmed into Osawatomie, where they sacked and burned the town. Both sides sustained about a half dozen casualties, the most of any battle during the Bleeding Kansas period. Among the dead was John Brown's son, Frederick.”

"'God sees it. I have only a short time to live - only one death to die, and I will die fighting for this cause. There will be no more peace in this land until slavery is done for.'"-
John Brown

snip... two weeks later... a letter...

“A company of Georgians & others came ... & camped near our town – some 4 miles off – They soon commenced running off the horses of free State men into Missouri. In the space of [xxx] days eighteen were missing – 14 from free state men, & 4 from Indians – nine were seen at one time in their possession, all having taken in one night. Cattle were slautered by them – etc-

A company of free collected to rout them – they got word of it – left carrying off what they considered most valuable as far as they could – horses & guns were all taken with them. In their block house, or fort, was found several hundred dollars worth of ready made clothing, jewelry and other articles which had probably all, or nearly all been taken when Lawrence was sacked. Some provision & groceries were left by them. They went to Missouri, & now for four days rumors are constantly reaching us that a large force is coming to sack & burn our place. If they can find the people here of their guard, or if they can get a large enough force, I have no doubt they will try it.”


snip...

“Our house was on a high hill commanding the west entrance to the town and was occupied by a number of young men armed for its defense. Only my brother and I were at home, father being in Lawrence after supplies for the defenders of the place. About Sunrise we descried the enemy, first from our house, the morning of August 30th. A shot was heard when some one of our little garrison, cried out that the Missourians were coming, whereupon I immediately ran to the door and gave the alarm. They were in full view and pretty close. … the enemy were forming on the hill and numbered about 200, but I afterwards learned they were nearly 400.”

snip...

“I heard the word given to burn the town which made a very hot fire. After that they loaded the wagons with the goods plundered from the houses. One of them ordered me to put the chairs on the wagon which I did not do, wherewith he came running at me with his bayonet, cursing and threatening to “stick” me if I did not do it.” “When on their retreat from the town, they stopped at our house while they plundered and then burnt it. They attempted to get out the piano, but in the excitement and heat of the rapidly spreading flames they were compelled to drop it in the doorway, two partly burnt legs and the iron frame only remained to tell the story of its final end.”

snip...

“On the morning of the 30th Aug an attack was made by the ruffians on Osawatomie numbering some 400 by whose scouts our dear Fredk was shot dead without warning he supposing them to be Free State men or near as we can learn. One other man a Cousin of Mr. Adair was murdered by them about the same time. At this time I was about 3 miles off where I had some 14 or 15 men over night that I had just enlisted to serve under me as regulars. There I collected as well as I could with some 12 or 15 more & in about ¾ of an Hour attacked them from a wood with thick undergroth, with this force we threw them into confusion for about 15 or 20 minutes during which time we killed & wounded from 70 to 80 of the enemy as they say & then we escaped as well as we could with one killed while escaping; two or three wounded; & as many more missing. Four or Five Free State men were butchered during the day as well. Jason fought bravely by my side during the fight & escaped with me he unhurt. I was struck by a partly spent Grape Canister, or Rifle shot which bruised me some but did not injure me seriously. “Hitherto the Lord both helped me” notwithstanding my afflictions. Things now seem rather quiet just now; but what another Hour will bring I cannot say...” -John Bown
 

5fish

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Here the wiki....


snip...

The Battle of Osawatomie was an armed engagement that occurred on August 30, 1856, when 250–400 pro-slavery Border Ruffians, led by John W. Reid, attacked the town of Osawatomie, Kansas, which had been settled largely by anti-slavery Free-Staters. Reid was intent on destroying the Free-State settlement and then moving on to Topeka and Lawrence to do more of the same. Abolitionist John Brown first learned of the raiders when they shot his son Frederick. With just 40 or so men, Brown tried to defend the town against the pro-slavery partisans, but ultimately was forced to withdraw; five Free-Staters were killed in the battle, and the town of Osawatomie was subsequently looted and burned by Reid's men. The battle was one of a series of violent clashes between abolitionists and pro-slavery partisans in Kansas and Missouri during the Bleeding Kansas era.
 
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