Lewis Addison Grant his Moments...

5fish

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Lewis Addison Grant had his moments in the civil war overlooked by history except for the tiny corners of it... He had s moment in the Shendoaha valley... and at the break through in April at Petersburg for it was his plans... a medal of Honor



Grant and the Vermont Brigade also had a key role in the Battle of Cedar Creek in October 1864. After General Philip S. Sheridan’s famous ride from Winchester to rally his troops, he reportedly stopped in front of the exhausted Vermont Brigade and asked what troops they were. Cries of “The Vermont Brigade! The Sixth Corps!” answered him, and Sheridan nodded and said, “We are all right,” before riding off. The Vermont Brigade helped to regain the ground lost earlier in the day, and Grant earned a promotion to brevet major general.

Grant also gained renown for his carefully planned and meticulous plan to break through Confederate lines at Petersburg. After studying the terrain and relaying detailed instructions to his troops, the assault was executed almost flawlessly and broke through the lines on April 2, 1865, ending the 272 day-long siege and sending General Lee’s army reeling. In later accounts of this incident, Grant is extraordinarily humble, acknowledging that he had been wounded a few moments before the attack began, which forced him to sit the action out. However, contemporaries argue that without his studying of the terrain and the proposed attack, in action to detailed plans that left no room for error, the attack could not have proceeded as it had, and thus Grant deserves credit.


Early in 1863, Grant was given the command of the Vermont Brigade. Grant led an assault at Salem Heights, Virginia, part of the Chancellorsville Campaign, where his “extraordinary heroism” earned him a Medal of Honor. At Gettysburg, the Vermont Brigade relieved the beleaguered V Corps troops on Little Round Top late July 2. At the Battle of the Wilderness, Grant and his brigade defended a crucial point near the Brock Road-Plank Road Intersection, helping to hold off an attack of an entire Confederate division.
 

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Here he blunt Longstreet's flanking move at the Wilderness


The Vermont Brigade at the WIlderness
The Vermont Brigade was made up of five regiments commanded by Brigadier General Lewis A. Grant. The veteran brigade entered the battle with 2,800 men and lost 1,200 casualties holding the south flank of the Army of the Potomac against fierce attacks by Longstreet’s Confederate First Corps on May 6, 1864. The Vermont Brigade is also honored by monuments on the Antietam Battlefield and the Gettysburg Battlefield.
 
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