J. E. B. Stuart

Jim Klag

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February 6, 1833 - J. E. B. Stuart [James Ewell Brown "Jeb" Stuart], Confederate General in the American Civil War, born in Patrick County, Virginia (d. 1864)

 

Jim Klag

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5fish

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Here a ditty... Look Stuart at commanders were all professional soldiers with combat experience except one... They had been taught at Cavalry tactic before the war...


The Confederate officers who made up the leadership of the Cavalry Division of the Army of Northern Virginia, and who fought with that organization during the Gettysburg Campaign, for the most part were professional soldiers. The division commander and five of his principal subordinates were graduates of the U. S. Military Academy. All except Chambliss had pre-war combat experience, and that officer taught mounted tactics at the cavalry school in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Further, although not a soldier by profession or experience before the war, Stuart was most fortunate in having Wade Hampton, a "natural soldier," as his second in command. Even Jenkins and Imboden, practiced more in hit-and-run raids and tactics than conventional tactics, proved themselves capable in their assigned roles during the opening and closing moves of the campaign. Dedicated to the Southern cause, devoted to and believing in their army commander, Robert E. Lee, used to working together, and confident of the superiority of their men over the enemy's, Stuart and his brigade commanders had every reason to expect success in the great episode that would become known as the Gettysburg Campaign. That they failed to achieve total dominance over the Federal cavalry or the accomplishment of the goals Stuart hoped to obtain was due more to the changing nature of the war and their opponents, than any lack of skill on their part. Two years of fighting; better officers emerging to lead them; a decline in the quality of horse flesh in the Confederate army, and an inexhaustible supply of good arms and equipment to keep them well appointed in the field, helped the Union troopers change the tempo and nature of mounted warfare in the East. Starting with Brandy Station and continuing through the rest of the conflict, numbers and firepower on the Federal side would balance out the elan and natural horsemanship of the Confederate cavalry, reducing the contest to one of attrition with constant skirmishing and pitched battles between the Blue and Gray riders. All of these indications of what was to be were present during the Gettysburg Campaign and all of them came to pass.

Here ia Carlisle secong oldest military

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Carlisle Barracks is a United States Army facility located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. The site of the U.S. Army War College, it is the nation's second-oldest active military base. The first structures were built in 1757, during the French and Indian War between Great Britain and France in the colonies.

Here is the school...


In 1838, a Cavalry School of Practice was established at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, which in time also became the Army's recruiting center for new mounted recruits. Commanded by Edwin Vose Sumner, the program was started from scratch. The close association between field artillery and mounted units began with the location of the Army's light artillery, also in Carlisle, in 1839. Captain Samuel Ringgold trained his recruits and tested equipment for the "flying artillery", as it was called, and gained fame during the Mexican–American War.
 
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5fish

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I found the marriage of Stuart's daughter. It's a great little read...


The buildings and grounds of the Virginia Female Institute were festooned with flowers and banners for the highlight of the 1887 social season in Staunton – the marriage of Virginia Pelham Stuart, daughter of the colorful Confederate cavalry leader, Gen. J.E.B. Stuart, to Robert Page Waller of Norfolk
 

5fish

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Stuart's wife had a successful life... just the opening lines...


Flora Cooke Stuart was the wife of Confederate general J. E. B. Stuart and the daughter of Union general Philip St. George Cooke. She met Stuart, a dashing subordinate of her father, while living in the Kansas Territory in the 1850s, and after marrying, the two settled in Virginia. Secession, however, split their family, with Cooke, a respected cavalryman, remaining in the United States Army and Stuart eventually becoming chief of cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia. “He will regret it but once & that will be continually,” Stuart said of his father-in-law’s decision; he even renamed his and Flora’s months’-old son, Philip St. George Cooke Stuart, after himself, James Ewell Brown Stuart Jr. During the American Civil War (1861–1865), Flora Stuart spent as much time as possible in camp with her husband, and chafed at the generous attention he received from admiring women in Virginia and across the South. When Stuart died after being wounded at the Battle of Yellow Tavern (1864), she donned mourning garb and wore it for the remaining fifty-nine years of her life. During that time, she served as headmistress of a women’s school in Staunton that was subsequently named for her. She later moved to Norfolk, where she died in 1923.
 
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