Hadrian Wall or Maginot Line...

5fish

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Russia created a great wall to protect its Southern border centuries back. It was called Great Zasechnaya cherta


Zasechnaya cherta (Russian: Большая засечная черта, loosely translated as Great Abatis Line or Great Abatis Border) was a chain of fortification lines, created by Grand Duchy of Moscow and later the Tsardom of Russia to protect it from the Crimean-Nogai Raids that ravaged the southern provinces of the country via the Muravsky Trail during the Russo-Crimean Wars.

There were a large number of fortification lines in Russian history and it is difficult to get good information on them. The lines naturally moved south as the Russian state expanded. The earliest reference to abatis fortifications appears to be in a Novgorod chronicle of 1137-1139. Abatis lines began appearing in southern Rus' in the 13th century. The 'Great Abatis Line' extended from Bryansk to Meschera and was nominally completed in 1566. It was guarded by a local militia of about 35,000 in the second half of the 16th century. Another source gives an annual callup of 65,000. Behind the line was a mobile army headquartered in Tula (6,279 men in 1616, 17,005 in 1636).

There are several notable lines. The oldest one (finished by 1563-1566) ran from Nizhniy Novgorod along the Oka River to Kozelsk,[4] and was built by Ivan the Terrible. The next one, built a while later, followed the line Alatyr - Orel - Novgorod Seversky - Putivl. Feodor I of Russia had built the abatis on the line Livny - Kursk - Voronezh - Belgorod. Simbirsk line[5] was constructed about 1640, and continued the Belgorod line from Tambov to Simbirsk on the Volga River.[6] In 1730-31 the Kama line separated Kazan from the Bashkirs. From about 1736 a Samara-Orenburg line closed in the Baskirs from the south.



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5fish

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I found another modern-day wall in our world. It is the Moroccan Western Sahara Wall. It has a few names and it was built by the Moroccans to keep other people off the land. It is the longest minefield in the world, too.


This war-torn territory is divided by the Moroccan Wall, a 1,600-mile-long, 10-foot-tall fortified berm, or sand wall. At 16 times longer than the Berlin wall was, the Moroccan Wall, also known as “the Berm,” is one of the largest active military barriers. Landmines dot the length of the fortification, making it also the longest minefield in the world.

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The barrier minebelt that runs along the structure is thought to be the longest continuous minefield in the world. Military bases, artillery posts and airfields dot the Moroccan-controlled side of the wall at regular intervals, and radar masts and other electronic surveillance equipment scan the areas in front of it.

A map where it is located..
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5fish

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It seems 4000 years ago the people living in northern Arabia built walls around oases and some of these walls stretched for 9 miles.


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The scientists also estimate that the rampart measured between around 5 and 8 feet in thickness and was approximately 16 feet in height. The vast fortification enclosed an area of nearly 1,100 hectares (2,718 acres).

The Khaybar site bears similarities to other walled oases dating back to the Bronze Age that have been documented in this region. Evidence suggests that the oases of the North Arabian Desert were inhabited by sedentary populations as far back as the fourth and third millennia B.C.
 

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China has another Great Wall called the Great Green Wall has been being built since 1978. It seems they want to keep back the Gobi dessert...

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The 'Great Green Wall' or, more formally, the Three-North Shelterbelt Forest Programme has been one method the Chinese authorities have deployed to slow down desertification in this region. The 'wall' is actually strips and patches of trees planted in vast swathes across the north of China.


The Great Green Wall, officially known as the Three-North Shelter Forest Program (simplified Chinese: 三北防护林; traditional Chinese: 三北防護林; pinyin: Sānběi Fánghùlín), also known as the Three-North Shelterbelt Program, is a series of human-planted windbreaking forest strips (shelterbelts) in China, designed to hold back the expansion of the Gobi Desert,[1] and provide timber to the local population.[2] The program started in 1978, and is planned to be completed around 2050,[3] at which point it will be 4,500 kilometres (2,800 mi) long.

The project's name indicates that it is to be carried out in all three of the northern regions: the North, the Northeast and the Northwest.[4] This project has historical precedences dating back to before the Common Era. However, in premodern periods, government sponsored afforestation projects along the historical frontier regions were mostly for military fortification.
 

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Another wall found in Europe... in the deserts they are called kites...


A stone age wall discovered beneath the waves off Germany’s Baltic coast may be the oldest known megastructure built by humans in Europe, researchers say.

The wall, which stretches for nearly a kilometre along the seafloor in the Bay of Mecklenburg, was spotted by accident when scientists operated a multibeam sonar system from a research vessel on a student trip about 10km (six miles) offshore.


Closer inspection of the structure, named the Blinkerwall, revealed about 1,400 smaller stones that appear to have been positioned to connect nearly 300 larger boulders, many of which were too heavy for groups of humans to have moved.

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Carvings on these stones depict nearby desert kites, massive structures once used to capture animal herds, scientists report May 17 in PLOS ONE. Desert kites consist of stone walls up to five kilometers long that narrow into large enclosures surrounded by pits where hunters trapped animals, such as gazelles and deer (SN: 4/18/11). Kite depictions at the two sites closely resemble the shape, layout and proportions of desert kites found close by, archaeologist Rémy Crassard and colleagues say.
 

rittmeister

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Another wall found in Europe... in the deserts they are called kites...


A stone age wall discovered beneath the waves off Germany’s Baltic coast may be the oldest known megastructure built by humans in Europe, researchers say.

The wall, which stretches for nearly a kilometre along the seafloor in the Bay of Mecklenburg, was spotted by accident when scientists operated a multibeam sonar system from a research vessel on a student trip about 10km (six miles) offshore.


Closer inspection of the structure, named the Blinkerwall, revealed about 1,400 smaller stones that appear to have been positioned to connect nearly 300 larger boulders, many of which were too heavy for groups of humans to have moved.


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Carvings on these stones depict nearby desert kites, massive structures once used to capture animal herds, scientists report May 17 in PLOS ONE. Desert kites consist of stone walls up to five kilometers long that narrow into large enclosures surrounded by pits where hunters trapped animals, such as gazelles and deer (SN: 4/18/11). Kite depictions at the two sites closely resemble the shape, layout and proportions of desert kites found close by, archaeologist Rémy Crassard and colleagues say.
that wall seems to have not any defensive purpose
 

5fish

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that wall seems to have not any defensive purpose
That is the scientist's first guess of what the wall was used for it seems to be a short wall...

While the purpose of the wall is hard to prove, scientists suspect it served as a driving lane for hunters in pursuit of herds of reindeer.

“When you chase the animals, they follow these structures, they don’t attempt to jump over them,” said Jacob Geersen at the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research in Warnemünde, a German port town on the Baltic coast.
 
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