General Chambliss Cavalry Officer...

5fish

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Here another young Confederate General killed in the line of duty. His death is record for history...

Here is Wiki take...


John Randolph Chambliss Jr. (January 23, 1833 – August 16, 1864) was a career military officer, serving in the United States Army and then, during the American Civil War, in the Confederate States Army. A brigadier general of cavalry, Chambliss was killed in action during the Second Battle of Deep Bottom.

Here a summary of his time in charge of Lee's brigade...


In November he was assigned with his regiment to W. H. F. Lee's cavalry brigade, with the gallant record of which he was identified, as one of the bravest and ablest of its officers, until he gave his life for the cause which he had served with entire fidelity and self-sacrificing devotion. In April, 1864, when the cavalry corps of the Federal army proposed to cross the Rappahannock and cut off Lee's communications with Richmond, Chambliss was particularly prominent in the defeat of the movement by Lee's brigade. At Beverly ford with 50 men he drove two Federal squadrons into the river, capturing a number of prisoners. He and his men were commended both by Generals Lee and Stuart as deserving the highest praise for distinguished bravery. In the famous battle of Brandy Station, June 9, 1863, after W. H. F. Lee was wounded and Col. Sol Williams killed, Chambliss took command of the brigade, and served in that capacity during the fighting about Aldie and Middleburg. Then riding with Stuart into Pennsylvania, he made a brilliant attack upon Kilpatrick at Hanover, driving him through the town and capturing his ambulances and a number of prisoners. His brigade and Fitz Lee's reached Gettysburg late on July 2d, and on the 3d he engaged in the fierce cavalry fight on the left of the Confederate line, between the York pike and Hanover road. Upon the retirement of the army, he aided efficiently in the protection of the Confederate trains. During the Bristoe campaign, still in command of the brigade, he reinforced Lomax at Morton's ford and defeated the enemy; and at Brandy Station the same two brigades fought with the utmost gallantry under their intrepid leaders, Chambliss winning anew the commendation of Stuart. Promoted brigadier-general in December, 1864, he continued in command of the brigade which he had led so long, through the cavalry fighting from the Rapidan to the James, gaining fresh laurels in the defeat of the enemy at Stony creek. Finally, in a cavalry battle on the Charles City road, on the north side of the James, he was killed while leading his men, August 16, 1864. His body was buried with honor by the enemy,
 

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Here is Chambliss at Hanover...


Covering much more ground on June 30 than the Federal infantry was the Federal cavalry. General Kilpatrick’s division had spent the predawn hours of June 30 in Littlestown taking care of his men and mounts. Nearing dawn, this column of Federal cavalry moved out of Littlestown making their way towards Hanover, with their objective of York, Pennsylvania. As the lead elements of the division approached Hanover they collided with Col. Chambliss’ Brigade. Chambliss’ lead regiment “not only repulsed the enemy, but drove him pell-mell through the town with half his numbers, capturing his ambulances, and a large number of prisoners….” The Confederate cavalry were only initially successful. Further Union reinforcements arrived on the scene, counterattacked, and began the process of throwing up barricades in the streets. The defensive works acted as a force multiplier for the Federals as they awaited more supports. Not long into the break in the skirmish, Michigan troopers under the command of General Custer arrived. Dismounted, Custer’s men fought in a pitched back-and-forth action with Confederate cavalry as their slowly arriving reinforcements came to their beleaguered assistance. “After a fight of about two hours, in which the whole command at different times was engaged, I made a vigorous attack upon their center, forced them back…and finally succeeded in breaking center,” Kilpatrick reported to Pleasonton that evening. Only darkness brought an end to the fight, and with it, the retreat of the Confederate cavalry from the field.[iv]
 

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Here is Emerging Civil War on General Chambliss death... summary of his career... Its another interesting story...


When the Pennsylvanians called out for Chambliss to surrender, the general spurred his horse to the rear and was promptly fired upon by the Federals. The general was immediately hit in the neck and chest and dropped dead from the saddle. Curious Yankees surrounded the corpse and began cutting of mementos from his uniform until Davis Gregg arrived on the scene. “The general was a small man, neatly dressed having on a fine, white linen shirt with coat, hat and pants to match,” recalled a member of the 5th New Hampshire.
 
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