Crimean War of 1853-1856... The First Great War?

5fish

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The Crimean War was a world war you had Western Powers , Eastern Powers and Middle East Powers fighting among themselves. The Crimea the first modern war...

Snip... Modern...

The Crimean War was one of the first conflicts in which the military used modern technologies such as explosive naval shells, railways, and telegraphs.[14](Preface) The war was one of the first to be documented extensively in written reports and photographs. As the legend of the "Charge of the Light Brigade" demonstrates, the war quickly became an iconic symbol of logistical, medical and tactical failures and mismanagement. The reaction in Britain was a demand for professionalisation, most famously achieved by Florence Nightingale, who gained worldwide attention for pioneering modern nursing while treating the wounded.

Snip ... cause...

"In some sense the Crimean war was predestined and had deep-seated causes. Neither Nicholas I nor Napoleon III nor the British government could retreat in the conflict for prestige once it was launched. Nicholas needed a subservient Turkey for the sake of Russian security; Napoleon needed success for the sake of his domestic position; the British government needed an independent Turkey for the security of the Eastern Mediterranean ... Mutual fear, not mutual aggression, caused the Crimean war."

The longer-term causes involved the decline of the Ottoman Empire and the unwillingness of Britain and France to allow Russia to gain territory and power at the Ottoman Empire's expense


The immediate cause of the war involved the rights of Christian minorities in the Holy Land, which was a part of the Ottoman Empire. The French promoted the rights of Roman Catholics, while Russia promoted those of the Eastern Orthodox Church.

Snip... Ignore by History...

The war was given superficial treatment by historians and observers whose attentions were soon after directed westward by the American Civil War, at that time the more interesting. Thus, many Europeans either missed or ignored the lessons inherent in the destruction of the tenuous European balance as the rotten structure of despotism lurched its way toward the 20th century; Austria-Hungary, Russia, and Turkey continued along their decaying courses; France vaulted into continental leadership only to be displaced in 15 years by Prussia, the only state which appeared to profit from the Crimean experience.

Snip... Russia needed gold after the war..

Several factors were involved in Russia’s decision to offload its North American territories in Alaska, but the most pressing arose after its defeat in Crimea. The czarist government found itself in desperate need of gold to offset its crushing war debts, and there were concerns that Alaska might to be lost to the likes of Great Britain in a future war. The United States, which had been friendly with Russia during the Crimean War, eventually emerged as an obvious buyer for the territory.

Snip... a Global war...

Its name notwithstanding, the Crimean War was a global conflict that featured several different theaters of battle. Early clashes occurred in the Balkans and in Turkey, and the focus only shifted to Crimea after the Allies launched an invasion of the peninsula in September 1854.
While most of the war’s most famous battles would eventually take place in Crimea, naval actions and intermittent fighting also erupted in such far flung places as the Caucasus, the Black Sea, the Baltic and the White Sea on the Northwest coast of Russia. In August 1854, French and British forces even launched an unsuccessful attack on Petropavlovsk, a port city on Russia’s Pacific coastline near Siberia.


WE need to revise this war's place in history...
 

O' Be Joyful

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Several factors were involved in Russia’s decision to offload its North American territories in Alaska, but the most pressing arose after its defeat in Crimea. The czarist government found itself in desperate need of gold
If they had held on, they would have had the Rush to Klondike gold strike and then Prudhoe Bay--black gold...Texas "iced" tea.

Seward's Folly my as...
 

5fish

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The telegraph gave eyewitness reports from the front first time in history...

LINK:http://www.inventingeurope.eu/story/eye-witnessing-the-war-in-the-crimea-telegraph-vs-camera

Not only were allies able to share strategies using the telegraph, journalists could also share their war reports. The telegraph helped give the eye-witness reports of a war journalist like Times correspondent William Russell (1820–1907) a feeling of immediacy. The speed of the telegraph's arrival suggested an instant link with the place of action and helped establish trust in the message.

Using telegraph links, William Russell was able to quickly and easily disseminate his dispatches from the front as well. These made a great impression in Britain.

The trustworthiness of Russell's reports influenced political decisions. Queen Victoria fired the prime minister when she heard about the suffering of the British army during the harsh winter of 1854. When the minister of war read about the circumstances of the British soldiers and their lack of proper treatment, he sent nurse Florence Nightingale to Turkey to establish a hospital to treat the sick and wounded



 

5fish

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It was the first newspaper war...

Because of this gap there was an important role for those who fixed the public meaning of the war: journalists and pamphleteers, poets, artists and photographers, orators and priests. This was the first “modern” war in the age of mass communications – the first to be photographed, the first to use the telegraph, the first “newspaper war” – and it shaped our national consciousness.

Here is a link: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/8037668/The-Crimean-War-The-war-that-made-Britain-great.html

The link explains how this war changed Britain forever... in many ways... interesting read...
 

5fish

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Turkey had an telegraph issues... nice little story .... https://uh.edu/engines/epi1597.htm

Snips... be;low...

All this was making the role of the Ottoman Empire as Europe's land link to Asia very clear. And the Crimean War, just across the Black Sea, was exposing the need for telegraphic communication.

The British had quickly connected Europe to the Crimea with a 340-mile cable in the Black Sea. But lines would have to run all the way across the Ottoman Empire to link Europe with India. Historian Yakup Bektas tells how the Sultan's interest in telegraphy initially made his subjects nervous. It would clearly strengthen his control in remote regions of the Empire.

But the system was built, first from Edirne, near the Bulgarian border, to Istanbul, and then all the way to Karachi -- still a part of India. Local pashas resisted the telegraph, religious fundamentalists objected that corrupt ideas could travel those wires, and citizens raided the lines for wood and copper. Finally, a small army was given the task of protecting the system. Alphabets posed another difficulty. Turkish, whose alphabet was then a version of Arabic, needed special equipment. But English and French were also used.

The system went on line in 1865.
A year later, the transatlantic cable opened to service in the West, and the world was linked all the way from Bengal to Alaska. The world's first global communication network had been built. For a while, as the Sultan had hoped, telegraphy helped shore up his regime. The Ottoman Empire lasted until it became a casualty of WW-I.
 

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The Crimean War was a world war you had Western Powers , Eastern Powers and Middle East Powers fighting among themselves. The Crimea the first modern war...

Snip... Modern...

The Crimean War was one of the first conflicts in which the military used modern technologies such as explosive naval shells, railways, and telegraphs.[14](Preface) The war was one of the first to be documented extensively in written reports and photographs. As the legend of the "Charge of the Light Brigade" demonstrates, the war quickly became an iconic symbol of logistical, medical and tactical failures and mismanagement. The reaction in Britain was a demand for professionalisation, most famously achieved by Florence Nightingale, who gained worldwide attention for pioneering modern nursing while treating the wounded.

Snip ... cause...

"In some sense the Crimean war was predestined and had deep-seated causes. Neither Nicholas I nor Napoleon III nor the British government could retreat in the conflict for prestige once it was launched. Nicholas needed a subservient Turkey for the sake of Russian security; Napoleon needed success for the sake of his domestic position; the British government needed an independent Turkey for the security of the Eastern Mediterranean ... Mutual fear, not mutual aggression, caused the Crimean war."

The longer-term causes involved the decline of the Ottoman Empire and the unwillingness of Britain and France to allow Russia to gain territory and power at the Ottoman Empire's expense


The immediate cause of the war involved the rights of Christian minorities in the Holy Land, which was a part of the Ottoman Empire. The French promoted the rights of Roman Catholics, while Russia promoted those of the Eastern Orthodox Church.

Snip... Ignore by History...

The war was given superficial treatment by historians and observers whose attentions were soon after directed westward by the American Civil War, at that time the more interesting. Thus, many Europeans either missed or ignored the lessons inherent in the destruction of the tenuous European balance as the rotten structure of despotism lurched its way toward the 20th century; Austria-Hungary, Russia, and Turkey continued along their decaying courses; France vaulted into continental leadership only to be displaced in 15 years by Prussia, the only state which appeared to profit from the Crimean experience.

Snip... Russia needed gold after the war..

Several factors were involved in Russia’s decision to offload its North American territories in Alaska, but the most pressing arose after its defeat in Crimea. The czarist government found itself in desperate need of gold to offset its crushing war debts, and there were concerns that Alaska might to be lost to the likes of Great Britain in a future war. The United States, which had been friendly with Russia during the Crimean War, eventually emerged as an obvious buyer for the territory.

Snip... a Global war...

Its name notwithstanding, the Crimean War was a global conflict that featured several different theaters of battle. Early clashes occurred in the Balkans and in Turkey, and the focus only shifted to Crimea after the Allies launched an invasion of the peninsula in September 1854.
While most of the war’s most famous battles would eventually take place in Crimea, naval actions and intermittent fighting also erupted in such far flung places as the Caucasus, the Black Sea, the Baltic and the White Sea on the Northwest coast of Russia. In August 1854, French and British forces even launched an unsuccessful attack on Petropavlovsk, a port city on Russia’s Pacific coastline near Siberia.


WE need to revise this war's place in history...
What about the Seven Years War from 1778 to 1785 that involved Spain,France and the Netherlands on one side vs the UK that was fought in North America and the Indian Subcontinent?
Kirk's Raiders
 

5fish

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What about the Seven Years War from 1778 to 1785 that involved Spain,France and the Netherlands on one side vs the UK that was fought in North America and the Indian Subcontinent?
Kirk's Raiders
I would have to look more but if I remember right all the fighting was in North America... Not Globally...
 

5fish

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If they had held on, they would have had the Rush to Klondike gold strike and then Prudhoe Bay--black gold...Texas "iced" tea.

Seward's Folly my as...
A folly like the Mulan Rouge ...
 

5fish

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What about the Seven Years War from 1778 to 1785 that involved Spain,France and the Netherlands on one side vs the UK that was fought in North America and the Indian Subcontinent?
Need to clarify a few things the Seven Years war was from...
  • began 1756
  • ended 1763
It was before our ARW... Our part in the Seven Years war was the French and Indian war...
 

5fish

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Here is something to thing about:::: Seven Years War... has many names...

In the historiography of some countries, the war is named after combatants in its respective theatres. In the present-day United States – at the time, the southern English-speaking British colonies in North America – the conflict is known as the French and Indian War (1754–1763). In English-speaking Canada – the balance of Britain's former North American colonies – it is called the Seven Years' War (1756–1763). In French-speaking Canada, it is known as La guerre de la Conquête (the War of the Conquest). Swedish historiography uses the name Pommerska kriget (The Pomeranian War), as the Sweden–Prussian conflict in 1757–1762 was limited to Pomerania in northern central Germany.[9] The Third Silesian War involved Prussia and Austria (1756–1763). On the Indian subcontinent, the conflict is called the Third Carnatic War (1757–1763).
The war has been described as the first "world war",[10] although this label was also given to various earlier conflicts like the Eighty Years' War, the Thirty Years' War, the War of the Spanish Succession and the War of the Austrian Succession, and to later conflicts like the Napoleonic Wars. The term "Second Hundred Years' War" has been used in order to describe the almost continuous level of worldwide conflict between France and Great Britain during the entire 18th century, reminiscent of the Hundred Years' War of the 14th and 15th centuries.[11]
 

Kirk's Raider's

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Need to clarify a few things the Seven Years war was from...
  • began 1756
  • ended 1763
It was before our ARW... Our part in the Seven Years war was the French and Indian war...
My bad . I should of said the Anglo-French war if 1778 to 1783 which was five not seven years.
Kirk's Raiders
 

5fish

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The first MASH units....

More than 80% of the deaths in the Crimean War were caused by diseases such as typhus, typhoid, cholera and dysentery, owing to a lack of hygiene and sanitation.103 A cry for help provoked public and private initiatives back in Britain. Florence Nightingale began to nurse at the Ottoman Selimiye Barracks, turned into a temporary military hospital, which she is credited for reorganizing and improving its hygiene and sanitation.104 These very problems of ventilation, hygiene and sanitation were receiving increasing attention in medical theory and hospital designs of the time.105 Such developments were exemplified in an innovative work of medical engineering: the Renkioi hospital, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel as a set of prefabricated buildings, built in Britain and transported to Turkey.106 Facing a public outcry in Britain over the increasing deaths of soldiers, in February 1855 the War Office asked Brunel to design temporary prefabricated buildings to use as a hospital for the sick and wounded of the war. The idea was promoted publicly by Brunel’s close friend and brother-in-law Benjamin Hawes, at the time deputy undersecretary at the War Office.107 After studying information and reports from medical experts and hospital managers, including a report from Nightingale on the problems of sanitation and organization, Brunel had an experimental model erected on the premises of the Great Western Railway at Paddington and invited experts to examine it. Their critique allowed him to work out the principles to follow in the final version.108 Within a few weeks the construction began, the work being shared among multiple contractors. The project consisted of a complex of 36 main and other service buildings. Each main building included two ward rooms, each with 26 beds (see figure 9), ‘one nurse’s room, a small store-room, bath-room, and surgery, water closets, lavatories, and ventilating apparatus’.10

Snip>>>

Central to its design was the dominant medical theory that disease was caused and carried by ‘bad air’. The ventilation system, along with the provisions for sanitation and hygiene, is a reflection of this understanding.110 The ward rooms, for example, were ‘wide enough and high enough to ensure a good space of air to each bed’, and each room was ‘furnished with a small fan, or rotatory air-pump, which, easily worked by one man, is found capable of supplying 1,000 to 1,500 cubic feet of air per minute, or 20 to 30 feet for each patient’.111 In addition to this ‘mechanical supply of air’, opening windows are provided along the whole length of the eaves, and spaces left immediately beneath the roof at the two gables, amply sufficient together to ventilate the rooms thoroughly if any breezes are stirring, without the help of the fan.112 The Times correspondent who later visited the hospital observed that: ‘The roof is covered with felt and sheet tin: windows are numerous and supplied with blinds, which do not exclude air.’113 All the buildings were made of wood except the kitchens and laundries, which were constructed of iron and equipped with the latest machinery and appliances. Each set of buildings came with ‘a pumping apparatus, a small general reservoir, and a sufficient length of main, with all its branches, to supply water to every detached building’.11
 
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