Vikings the First to Battle Native Americas...

5fish

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It seems that are Viking records of them battling the local Native Americans in Vineland...

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Thorvald, the son of Erik the Red and brother of Lief Eiriksson, landed in the New World sometime around 985 CE. The 50-member party eventually set up a fortified camp on the large island. Yet almost as soon as the Norsemen hauled their long boats onto the beaches, fighting broke out with the local inhabitants.

A video a good summary of Viking time with Native Americans...

 

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Here is and interesting thing about Bows and Arrows among North American Native Americans... @diane . @O' Be Joyful , @rittmeister , @jgoodguy


American Indians did not always have the bow and arrow. It was not until about A.D. 500 that the bow and arrow was adopted in Iowa some 11,500 years after the first people came to the region. Primary benefits of the bow and arrow over the spear are more rapid missile velocity, higher degree of accuracy, and greater mobility. Arrowheads also required substantially less raw materials than spear heads. A flint knapper could produce a large number of small projectile points from a single piece of chert. Even with the gun's many advantages in the historic era, bows and arrows are much quieter than guns, allowing the hunter more chances to strike at the prey.

Here is a map showing how Bows and Arrows tech moved across North America...


Archaeological remains of bows and arrows (mostly small "arrowhead" points) indicate that the bow and arrow came from Siberian immigrants around 3000 BC. Artifacts found at a variety of sites in Alaska and northern Canada show dates around 1500 BC. This weapon moved south into the Mid-West (600-700AD), Southeast (700AD) and the Western United States by (500-200AD).Most archaeological texts have quoted these approximate dates consistently for the last 50 years.
 

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Here is Viking Bow and Arrow history...


Late Viking era laws from Norway and Sweden specified how free landowners were required to respond when summoned to a general muster of arms. In addition to bringing a spear, sword or axe, and a shield, each warrior was expected to be armed with a bow and arrows.
 

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It seems The Vikings brought Native Americans back with them... It's in the Icelanders' DNA...


Analyzing a type of DNA passed only from mother to child, scientists found more than 80 living Icelanders with a genetic variation similar to one found mostly in Native Americans. (Get the basics on genetics.)

This signature probably entered Icelandic bloodlines around A.D. 1000, when the first Viking-American Indian child was born, the study authors theorize. (Related: "Vikings' Barbaric Bad Rap Beginning to Fade.")

Historical accounts and archaeological evidence show that Icelandic Vikings reached Greenland just before 1000 and quickly pushed on to what is now Canada. Icelanders even established a village in Newfoundland, though it lasted only a decade or so (regional map).
 

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That's interesting about bow technology. I'm inclined to think it was a similar development that occurred for the same reasons - great minds think alike, sort of thing!

There are very, very few Shasta tribe bow and arrows but the concept is different from surrounding people. The bows are shorter, thicker and much more powerful - the Shasta were noted for the power and accuracy of their archers. They were far more accurate, in fact, than any rifle of their day. Not much attention has been paid to this, but a few have tried to recreate Shasta bows and arrows, which were as unique as the bows. Not too much success - these bows were the Stradivariuses of their times! As with the great violins, the materials do not exist any more to make them.
 

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Here the European to see the New World...


According to these two sagas (collectively known as the Icelandic Sagas), the man credited with the European' discovery' of North America was one Bjarni Herjólfsson in 985 CE. While sailing from Iceland to Greenland with a fleet of 25 ships, he was blown off course and, after three days of travel westward, eventually sighted land. Upon his return to Iceland, he described his adventures to Leif Erikson, who, approximately 15 years later, returned to this new land
 

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Claiming a place where a Viking is buried...


According to the Icelandic sagas and the 15th century Skalholtsbok manuscript, Thorwald—fatally wounded by natives he had attacked—requested to be buried at Krossanes, “Cape of the Crosses”, a mistranslation of Krossarnes, “Crossness”. This burial site has been claimed by Hampton, NH (which has a rock with rune-like scratchings claimed to be Thorvald’s headstone), as well as by Cape Neddick ME, Gloucester MA, Boston, Nahant, Lynn, and Duxbury. Duxbury even named a promontory Krossanes, quoting the same words other towns use to justify their claims. Other supposed runestones in New England, such as Dighton Rock in Berkeley, MA on the Taunton River, have not been authenticated despite perennial speculation. In Massachusetts, artifacts or sites of proposed but disputed Norse origin have also been declared in Cambridge, Hingham, Medford, and a number of spots on Cape Cod. 4
 

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I found this blog on Native American armor and I bet little of you knew Native Americans had wood armor but guns cause them to abanded it...


That's a picture of a Huron warrior from the early 17th century. What the man is wearing is a suit of armor made from flat wooden slats woven together. Similar armor was worn by warriors of the Iroquois, Powhatan, and many other tribes. Now, I saw that movie The New World a few years back, and even though I don't remember much of it (except that I thought it was boring), I'm pretty certain that it did not accurately depict any Powhatan battle armor. In fact I'm not aware of any media in which aboriginal American armor is depicted, and consequently I wonder if most people are aware it even existed.

Military body armor was abandoned in North America for the same reason it was abandoned everywhere else: guns. But the transition from armor use to gun use didn't happen all at once—it took about two centuries. The important factor is that, for the most part, guns entered North America from the east, and very gradually became available farther west, as more firearms saturated the intertribal trading networks and more European traders penetrated deeper into the continent. This is the model of the "Gun Frontier" (and of its counterpart the "Horse Frontier") that was popularized by Frank Secoy back in the 1950's.
 

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@diane , It seems the were the first to discover the Americas in 1200AD. It seems DNA tales tell the tale...


A provocative new study argues Polynesians and Native Americans made contact some 800 years ago. That date would place their first meeting before the arrival of Europeans in the Americas and before the settlement of Easter Island (Rapa Nui), which has been suggested as the site of such an initial encounter.

Their findings revealed a Native American genetic signature among people on some of Polynesia’s easternmost islands. Not only did this signature indicate a common source among Colombia’s indigenous peoples, but it also showed that the people who carry it on different islands shared the same Native American ancestors.


There are nay sayers...


“The earliest genetic signal of Native Southern Americans found by the authors in Polynesia was from people of the Southern Marquesas Islands, and the authors argue that Colombians mixed with Polynesians there around 1150 AD,” he wrote. “This date is so early that it could even suggest South Americans reached there before Polynesians arrived.”

Also casting doubt on that scenario is the fact that no South American tools, pottery, or other items have been found in Polynesia—though, for that matter, no Polynesian tools, pottery or other items have been found in South America, either. And while South American DNA is found in Polynesia, no Polynesian DNA is found in South America.
 

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More...


Indigenous Americans and Polynesians bridged vast expanses of open ocean around the year 1200 and mingled, leaving incontrovertible proof of their encounter in the DNA of present-day populations, new studies have revealed.

 
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More proof...

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sweet potato
Archaeological research has now conclusively shown that the sweet potato was introduced to Central Polynesia by approximately A.D. 1200 to 1300 (2), most likely by Polynesian voyagers who reached South America and subsequently spread the crop to the widely dispersed islands of the Polynesian triangle (e.g., ref. 3).

 

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Look the Polynesians may have been the first to see Antarctica, instead of a White man...


It has long been accepted that the first to see the icy continent was European, but research looking at the oral histories of Polynesians is painting a different story.
 

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A map for thought... 4 centuries later...

1698056594252.png
 

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Here is the Native American tribe they speculate the Viking met and fought... Beothuk
@diane

The Vinland Sagas document Viking contact with the Beothuks as early as 980 AD. The Norse called these indigenous peoples “Skraelings” or “barbarians” possibly because of their unusual appearance.
 

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Here is the Native American tribe they speculate the Viking met and fought... Beothuk
@diane

The Vinland Sagas document Viking contact with the Beothuks as early as 980 AD. The Norse called these indigenous peoples “Skraelings” or “barbarians” possibly because of their unusual appearance.
I think the Norse term may also have been because the Beothuks were said to be very fierce fighters. If they beat off the Vikings, they must have been!
 

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Here is a wise tale about Vikings reaching Minnesota in 1362...

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In 1898, a Swedish immigrant farmer claimed to have discovered a large rock with writing carved into its surface in a field near Kensington, Minnesota. The writing told a North American origin story, predating Christopher Columbus’s exploration, in which Viking missionaries reached what is now Minnesota in 1362 only to be massacred by Indians. The tale’s credibility was quickly challenged and ultimately undermined by experts, but the myth took hold.

We still have the stone...

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The Runestone and the enduring mystery of its origin continues to be the hallmark of the Runestone Museum. This intriguing artifact was discovered in 1898, clutched in the roots of an aspen tree on the Olof Öhman farm near Kensington, MN (15 miles southwest of Alexandria). The Runestone has led researchers from around the world and across the centuries on an exhaustive quest to explain how a runic artifact, dated 1362, could show up in North America.
 
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