Undefeated German General... Who told Hitler to F-off...

5fish

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Well, it seems a German general that few know about makes it to the list of never been defeated in battle. He fought in WW one and was a Prussian of the Junker class... and later in life told Hitler to "F--Off"... It was always outmanned in the field against his opponents... @rittmeister , @Wehrkraftzersetzer


Paul Emil von Lettow-Vorbeck (20 March 1870 – 9 March 1964) was a general in the Imperial German Army and the commander of its forces in the German East Africa campaign. For four years, with a force that never exceeded about 14,000 (3,000 Germans and 11,000 Africans), he held in check a much larger force of 300,000 British, Belgian, and Portuguese troops. Essentially undefeated in the field, von Lettow-Vorbeck was the only German commander to successfully invade imperial British soil during World War I. His exploits in the campaign have come down "as the greatest single guerrilla operation in history, and the most successful."[

Here is the story about him tell Hitler to "F--off"...


It was therefore somewhat remarkable that Lettow-Vorbeck not only survived until 1918, but did so with his force undefeated and having been the only German commander to invade the territory of the British Empire.

...

He was not going to be offered tangible power in Germany, but a glitteringly symbolic role safely based overseas. In 1935, Hitler offered him the ambassadorship to the Court of St. James’s, to become Germany’s main man in London.

And this is where accounts of his famous response diverge. The meaning is always the same, but the language is quite different. At the more polite end of history, it was noted that he “declined with frigid hauteur.” So far, so Prussian.

But Lettow-Vorbeck was a military man through and through, so it is well within the realms of possibility that he responded with something decidedly more earthy. Charles Miller interviewed one of Lettow-Vorbeck’s nephews, noting that, “I understand that von Lettow told Hitler to go fuck himself.” The nephew responded, “That’s right, except that I don’t think he put it that politely.”

Lettow-Vorbeck’s fame protected him from instant reprisal, but he was punished with the suspension of his pension, surveillance from the regime
and sidelining during the glory days of Nazi military victories. Lettow-Vorbeck would, however, have the last word. He survived the tumultuous years of the Second World War whereas Hitler shot himself in his bunker as Russians overran the streets of Berlin.



 

rittmeister

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Well, it seems a German general that few know about makes it to the list of never been defeated in battle. He fought in WW one and was a Prussian of the Junker class... and later in life told Hitler to "F--Off"... It was always outmanned in the field against his opponents... @rittmeister , @Wehrkraftzersetzer


Paul Emil von Lettow-Vorbeck (20 March 1870 – 9 March 1964) was a general in the Imperial German Army and the commander of its forces in the German East Africa campaign. For four years, with a force that never exceeded about 14,000 (3,000 Germans and 11,000 Africans), he held in check a much larger force of 300,000 British, Belgian, and Portuguese troops. Essentially undefeated in the field, von Lettow-Vorbeck was the only German commander to successfully invade imperial British soil during World War I. His exploits in the campaign have come down "as the greatest single guerrilla operation in history, and the most successful."[

Here is the story about him tell Hitler to "F--off"...


It was therefore somewhat remarkable that Lettow-Vorbeck not only survived until 1918, but did so with his force undefeated and having been the only German commander to invade the territory of the British Empire.

...

He was not going to be offered tangible power in Germany, but a glitteringly symbolic role safely based overseas. In 1935, Hitler offered him the ambassadorship to the Court of St. James’s, to become Germany’s main man in London.

And this is where accounts of his famous response diverge. The meaning is always the same, but the language is quite different. At the more polite end of history, it was noted that he “declined with frigid hauteur.” So far, so Prussian.

But Lettow-Vorbeck was a military man through and through, so it is well within the realms of possibility that he responded with something decidedly more earthy. Charles Miller interviewed one of Lettow-Vorbeck’s nephews, noting that, “I understand that von Lettow told Hitler to go fuck himself.” The nephew responded, “That’s right, except that I don’t think he put it that politely.”

Lettow-Vorbeck’s fame protected him from instant reprisal, but he was punished with the suspension of his pension, surveillance from the regime
and sidelining during the glory days of Nazi military victories. Lettow-Vorbeck would, however, have the last word. He survived the tumultuous years of the Second World War whereas Hitler shot himself in his bunker as Russians overran the streets of Berlin.
it would most likely have ended with sabres at dawn if you called him a democrat, though
 

5fish

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Here is another man who refused to kill Jewish women and children and live to tell the tell... He did kill men.. He was SS... And made General... And live telil 80...


Schulz's case was notable for demonstrating that service in the Einsatzgruppen was voluntary. He did not volunteer for the job, nor did he turn it down. Previously, he'd expressed opposition to mass shootings. Under orders, however, Schulz, despite "serious misgivings," participated in the massacres of Jewish men.[2] After being ordered to kill Jewish women and children, he protested. When he was unable to get the order retracted, he asked if he could stop. The request was granted within days, with him being discharged on the orders of Reinhard Heydrich himself. Schulz not only faced no consequences for stopping, but was promoted shortly after. By the end of the war, he'd reached the rank of Brigadeführer, the SS equivalent of a brigadier general.[3][4
 
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rittmeister

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Here is another man who refused to kill Jewish women and children and live to tell the tell... He did kill men.. He was SS... And made General... And live telil 80...


Schulz's case was notable for demonstrating that service in the Einsatzgruppen was voluntary. He did not volunteer for the job, nor did he turn it down. Previously, he'd expressed opposition to mass shootings. Under orders, however, Schulz, despite "serious misgivings," participated in the massacres of Jewish men.[2] After being ordered to kill Jewish women and children, he protested. When he was unable to get the order retracted, he asked if he could stop. The request was granted within days, with him being discharged on the orders of Reinhard Heydrich himself. Schulz not only faced no consequences for stopping, but was promoted shortly after. By the end of the war, he'd reached the rank of Brigadeführer, the SS equivalent of a brigadier general.[3][4
i admit he's a tricky one but i would hardly call him one of the good guys ... and 'undefeated'? i don't recall him fighting troops (at least no regulars).
 

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Was this man the "Savior of Paris"...???


Choltitz is chiefly remembered for his role as the last commander of Nazi-occupied Paris in 1944, when he allegedly disobeyed Adolf Hitler's orders to destroy the city, and instead surrendered it to Free French forces when they entered the city on 25 August. Choltitz later asserted that his defiance of Hitler's direct order stemmed from its obvious military futility, his affection for the French capital's history and culture, and his belief that Hitler had by then become insane. Other sources suggest that he had little control of the city thanks to the operations of the French Resistance, and could not have carried out such orders anyway.


German resistance was light, and General Dietrich von Choltitz, commander of the German garrison, defied an order by Adolf Hitler to blow up Paris’ landmarks and burn the city to the ground before its liberation.
 

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Hitler had what is now called the Nero Decree...

.

The Nero Decree (German: Nerobefehl) was issued by Adolf Hitler on 19 March 1945, ordering the destruction of German infrastructure to prevent its use by Allied forces as they penetrated deep within Germany. It was officially titled Decree Concerning Demolitions in the Reich Territory (Befehl betreffend Zerstörungsmaßnahmen im Reichsgebiet) and has subsequently become known as the Nero Decree, after the Roman Emperor Nero, who, according to an apocryphal story,[1] engineered the Great Fire of Rome in 64 AD. The decree was deliberately disobeyed by Albert Speer shortly before the fall of the Nazi regime.

More on Paris...

This was not the first time Hitler had tried to destroy infrastructure before it could be taken. Shortly before the Liberation of Paris, Hitler ordered explosives to be placed around important landmarks, such as the Eiffel Tower, and key transportation hubs. If the Allies came near the city, the military governor, General Dietrich von Choltitz was to detonate these bombs, leaving Paris "lying in complete debris".[4] Von Choltitz, however, did not carry out the order and surrendered to the Allies, later alleging that this was the moment he realised that "Hitler was insane". Similarly, Hitler had issued orders to enact a scorched earth policy upon the Netherlands in late 1944, when it became obvious that the Allies were about to retake the country, but Arthur Seyss-Inquart, the Reichskommissar in charge of the Netherlands during its occupation, was able to greatly limit the scope to which the order was executed.[5
 

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Here is a German general who stood up to Hitler and lived... Dietrich von Saucken...


A cavalry officer who regularly wore both a sword and a monocle, Saucken personified the archetypal aristocratic Prussian conservative who despised the braune Bande ("brown mob") of Nazis. When he was ordered to take command of the Second Army on 12 March 1945, he came to Hitler's headquarters with his left hand resting casually on his cavalry sabre, his monocle in his eye, . . . [and then] gave a military salute and gave a slight bow. These were three 'outrages' at once. He had not given the Nazi salute with raised arm and the words 'Heil Hitler', as had been regulation since 20 July 1944, he had not surrendered his weapon on entering....and had kept his monocle in his eye when saluting Hitler.[2][3]

When Hitler told him that he must take his orders from Albert Forster, the Gauleiter (Nazi governor, or "District Leader") of Danzig, Saucken returned Hitler's gaze....and striking the marble slab of the map table with the flat of his hand, he said, 'I have no intention, Herr Hitler, of placing myself under the orders of a Gauleiter'. In doing this he had bluntly contradicted Hitler and not addressed him as Mein Führer.[2][4]

To the surprise of everyone who was present, Hitler capitulated and replied, "All right, Saucken, keep the command yourself." Hitler dismissed the General without shaking his hand and Saucken left the room with only the merest hint of a bow.[2][4]

However, this alleged incident is disputed by Heinz Linge in his book 'In the footsteps of the Führer'. General Von Saucken was considered a loyal commander to whom this behavior certainly did not fit (he received the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds on May 8). In addition, the fact that he would not have addressed Hitler with 'Mein Führer' and with the flat hand on the chart table, Linge describes as completely unbelievable.[5]


If a Hollywood movie studio called Central Casting and said, “Send over a classic aristocratic German army general,” Dietrich von Saucken would have showed up.

He was the living personification of the Prussian military stereotype: coldly humorless, ramrod straight, shiny black boots, smugly looking down his nose while wearing, of course, the obligatory monocle.
 

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Here is this general who was Hitler's chief of staff... A Bavarian Franz Halder was not tried for war crimes makes you ask why?


Why???

As the campaign in the east faltered, Hitler’s tolerance for Halder reached an end, and he was dismissed as chief of staff in September 1942. During his retirement, he remained in contact with Beck, and this connection implicated him in the failed July Plot to assassinate Hitler in 1944. Halder was arrested, along with hundreds of others, but he managed to avoid execution. He was imprisoned at Flossenbürg and Dachau concentration camps. In the closing days of the war, a number of prisoners who were of high value to the Nazis, including Halder, French premier Léon Blum, and Austrian chancellor Kurt von Schuschnigg, were transferred from Dachau to a hotel in the Tirolean Alps, and the group was liberated by Allied troops in May 1945.

Unlike other members of the German high command, Halder was not tried as a war criminal. From 1947 to 1961 he worked with the U.S. Army to construct a record of German military history and doctrine, and Halder’s personal diaries provided an invaluable chronicle of daily life at the highest levels of the Third Reich. For this work, the United States awarded Halder the Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 1961.
 
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