Little Big Horn Monument...

5fish

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Forty Years ago I fought Custer till all were dead. I was then the enemy of the Whitemen. Now I am the friend and brother, living in peace together under the flag of our country." -Two Moons, Northern Cheyenne

Look at those words do you see these words on Confederate Monuments about reconciliation... No, you don't...

https://www.nps.gov/libi/learn/historyculture/indian-memorial.htm

snip...


The Indian Memorial is now ensconced on the battlefield near Last Stand Hill. This is how the Friends of the Little Bighorn Battlefield organization describes the remarkable sculpture and its setting:
The Indian Memorial will surprise you. ….. If you didn't know it, you wouldn't know it's there. From the visitor center it appears to be a mound, slightly lifted above the ground. There is already prairie grass sprouting from the outside walls blending it beautifully within its environment.

You cross the street from Last Stand Hill and the first thing you come to is the wayside for Wooden Leg Hill and the Unknown Warrior marker on a distant ridge. Wooden Leg witnessed the death of an unknown warrior wearing a warbonnet when he was shot through the head.
From there you turn northwest and pass by the Horse Cemetery with the new marble marker including a 7th Cavalry Horse drawn by Park Historian, John Doerner. There is a wayside exhibit explaining the archeological dig that was conducted there. From there you follow the sidewalk to where it forks going east and west. The proper way to enter the Memorial is from the east entrance and exit from the west. As you approach the memorial it begins to swallow you into its power. It becomes taller and more mysterious. As you approach the east entrance of the Memorial you can see just above the mound the very tops of the Spirit Warriors….
When you enter the Memorial, you enter another world -- somber, deep, retrospective, and sacred. The Memorial is in the shape of a perfect circle. In the center is a circle of red dirt. Around it is a circled stone walkway. On the inner walls sit panels for each tribe that fought in the battle (Sioux, Cheyenne, Arapaho, Crow, Arikara). Each tribe lists their dead and there are some pictographs.
You are immediately taken by the Spirit Warriors standing high above you to the north. The area is wide open so the Montana prairie shines through. If you turn around from the Spirit Warriors you look through a gap in the mound called the Weeping Wall. It is here that water continually trickles down into a pool representing tears for the fallen warriors and soldiers. And, centered perfectly within the Weeping Wall can be seen the 7th Cavalry
Monument. This Spirit Gate welcomes the fallen soldiers to enter the Memorial and join the fallen warriors in friendship; “peace through unity.” Its symbolism is powerful in so many ways to say the least.

It is peaceful in this place, within this circle……
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5fish

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I think there should be a life size or bigger statue of Buffalo Calf Road Woman, knocking Custer from his horse...
 

5fish

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No every American Indian Battlefield there should be monuments to the Native Americans that fought there... The south did it after the Civil War and now its time for Native Peoples to do it as well...

From what I can tell there no monument at this battlefield to Native Americas...

 

5fish

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Here is this one about monuments to Indian Chiefs by white people... @diane


snip...


  • Source: "New York Tribune Sunday Magazine" for August 27, 1905
    Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by R. Ramos
    Where sleep the great chieftains of the historic past? No stone marks the last camp of Pontiac nor of Tecumseh. We know not the burial place of Blue Jacket, Little Turtle, Crane nor Logan. In the United States to-day are nine monuments erected by white men to perpetuate the memory of famous Indians, and the nine great warriors of the early wilderness thus remembered are Miantonomoh, Uncas, Keokuk, Leatherlips, Seattle, Red Jacket, Cornstalk, Tomo-chi-chi and Pokagon.
 

Matt McKeon

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There is an excellent book The Misplaced Massacre about establishing a national park on the site of the Sand Creek Massacre. Politics, tribal and federal, its pretty interestings.
 

5fish

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Little more...


The work was Toth's 10th statue of his "Trail of Whispering Giants," which now consists of 74 similar statues ranging from 20 to 40 feet high, with at least one place in each of the 50 states. There are also several in Canadian Providences and territories, all carved by Toth in an effort to honor Native Americans

For his Delaware piece, Toth chose to honor the Nanticoke tribe, which have also been known as "The People of the Tidewater" — a group that has resided throughout Delaware for over 300 years.

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5fish

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Here is the story in a nutshell they are aging and rotting away so the places are taking them down... sad... This one is in South Carolina... a video in the article...


“In 1977, 40 years ago someone here at Charles Towne landing thought it was historically accurate,” she said. “So, 40 years later someone here has decided they don’t like the sculpture anymore, and that's a shame.”

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5fish

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More...


Toth completed his first sculpture, of stone, in La Jolla, California in February 1972. The sculpture of a Native American head, measuring nearly 6 feet (1.8 m) in height from chin to forehead, was carved into a sandstone cliff located between Marine Street and Windansea Beach, and represented three months of work.[1]

Peter Wolf Toth realized his life's mission at the age of 24. In February 1972 he completed his first monumental sculpture, a stone Indian head, carved from the cliff at Wind and Sea Beach in La Jolla, California. By the summer he had switched from stone to wood. After finishing his second monumental sculpture, this time carved from a dead elm stump in Sand Run Park in Akron, Ohio, he made a dramatic decision: I will make a sculpture of an Indian, to honor them, in each of the fifty states.

This is the only picture of the California one...

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Here is Ohio's statue...

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5fish

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A Native Monument that never was... lets bring it back!!! @diane


The National American Indian Memorial or North American Indian Memorial was a proposed monument to Native Americans to be erected on a bluff overlooking the Narrows, the main entrance to New York Harbor. The major part of the memorial was to be a 165-foot-tall (50 m) statue of a representative American Indian warrior atop a substantial foundation building housing a museum of native cultures, similar in scale to, but higher than, the Statue of Liberty several miles to the north. Ground was broken to begin construction in 1913 but the project was never completed and no physical trace remains today.


In 1914, actor and activist Chauncey Yellow Robe condemned the project,[30] stating:


We see a monument of the Indian in New York harbor as a memorial of his vanishing race. The Indian wants no such memorial monument, for he is not yet dead. The name of the North American Indian will not be forgotten as long as the rivers flow and the hills and mountains shall stand, and though we have progressed, we have not vanished.[31]
Wanamaker had originally proposed Fort Lafayette as a site, and for a time Shore Road in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn was also considered, but in March 1910 Leonard Wood, a general in the US Army, suggested Fort Wadsworth.[12] By April 18, 1912,[14] this had been set as the location. The memorial was to be erected on the site of Fort Tompkins on Staten Island, New York. Fort Tompkins, a component of the larger Fort Wadsworth,[12] is located on a bluff high above the west side of the Narrows. It was and still is owned by the federal government. Virtually all ocean-going ships destined for New York pass the site, so the monument would have been highly visible to visitors, seen well before the Statue of Liberty would come into view.

On December 8, 1911, the United States Congress formally authorized the use of federal land for the monument, though Wanamaker would be responsible for providing funding.[15] The land was to be decided upon by the US Secretary of War and US Secretary of the Navy. The bill had been introduced by Taft.
[5]
 

5fish

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Here a monument unknown...


November 11, 2020, on the grounds of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC. The memorial was dedicated with a procession and ceremony on the National Mall on November 11, 2022. This tribute to Native heroes recognizes for the first time on a national scale the enduring and distinguished service of Native Americans in every branch of the US military.

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5fish

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I found this monument...


The Highground is honored to have been chosen as the home of The National Native American Vietnam Veterans Memorial, “The Forgotten Warrior.” Unanimous approval for this decision was given at the annual conference of the National Congress of American Indians held in Denver, CO in 1994.

 

diane

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Well.... I have to say, it's nice! The Vietnam one is particularly good. More Indians serve in the American military than any other minority, per capita. At all the powwows there is an honor dance for the veterans - all can come! They're warriors.

I've been around San Jose a lot and have never seen that Father Junipero Sierra...thankfully! Is there a bridge nearby that's lost its troll?
 

5fish

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Here a video about monuments never built in New York City and the last third is about the North American Indian Memorial... some more details...

 
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