Union statues in the Southwest also honor the war against Native Americans

byron ed

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Forgive my obtuseness, but you haven't been saying "overwhelmingly white." You've repeated ad nauseam "only legacy whites." I do know that our establishment has always been predominately white as has been our general population. I also know that since the Civil War it has never been only white. But it has always been THE ESTABLISHMENT regardless of demographics. Therefore it is categorically incorrect to assert that "only legacy whites" made the decisions whereof we speak and 100% accurate to say that the establishment did make them.
I forgive you your obtuseness then, but hey we're getting there.

It comes down to you're not liking my shorthand "only legacy whites." I can ditch the shorthand, which was only ever for the purpose of brevity to begin with, and go with "overwhelmingly white."

But conceding that an "overwhelmingly white" establishment made most of the decisions has to mean that it's not nearly 100% accurate to say it was the entirety of THE ESTABLISHMENT that made the decisions. (You'll note that I had already pointed out that no social metric can ever be 100% anyway, but let's leave that where it is). In truth it's more accurate to say that the overwhelmingly white component (legacy whites) of THE ESTABLISHMENT made most of the actual decisions, like naming things after defeated enemies.

So now we're in the territory of mere semantics. I understand that you're invested now in something having to be 100% accurate. So how about "the overwhelmingly white component (legacy whites) of THE ESTABLISHMENT made most of the actual decisions, like naming things after defeated enemies." That gives you your 100% accurate thing.
 
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Jim Klag

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In truth it's more accurate to say that the overwhelmingly white component (legacy whites) of THE ESTABLISHMENT made most of the actual decisions, like naming things after defeated enemies.
Let's not say that. It must be my old engineer's soul, but I am on a quest for precision. And you really have an obsessively pathological need to use the phrase "legacy white." Did your legacy white momma deprive you of your legacy white pacifier? However it was constituted (all white, mostly white, predominately white, overwhelmingly white), the establishment at that time in history made the decisions - even you can't split that hair any more finely. At whatever point in history a monument was decided upon, the local, county, state and federal establishments made the decision on the form and location of the monument. It is a fact that Native Americans commissioned monuments for Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. Their establishment is comprehensively not all white.
 

byron ed

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...It is a fact that Native Americans commissioned monuments for Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. Their establishment is comprehensively not all white...
That's interesting, and yes let's now delve into the less common naming conventions in this Country. I'm up for it.

I found it interesting how common it was to name things after defeated enemies in this Country, including native American leaders but also Confederate leaders, apparently nearly all it done in the time of the legacy white establishment, but we've covered that.

But also there's things abroad that were named after American notables. I saw a prominent statue of Lincoln in Edinborough Scotland when I was there. Is there a statue or a street named after Teddy Roosevelt in Cuba?, or MacArthur in the Philippines?, or Franklin in France?, or Commodore Perry in China?, and are they now being vandalized or torn down? Why is there a monument to invading Japanese soldiers on an Alaskan island?
 
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O' Be Joyful

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... it’s important to note that Arnold gained his command at West Point by dint of his previous battlefield service. Arnold was a brave, daring and aggressive commander. He had helped seize Fort Ticonderoga, participated in the invasion of Quebec and led American naval forces at the Battle of Valcour Island.

General Arnold’s greatest moment came during the Saratoga campaign, which ended with the surrender of an entire British army. The senior American commander, Horatio Gates, was often indecisive and shy of battle. Arnold, in contrast, was eager for battle. He personally led a successful charge on a British redoubt. During that fight, Arnold was shot in the leg and his horse fell on him.

Had Benedict Arnold died that day, he would likely be known as one of the great heroes of the American Revolutionary War. There would be towns, counties and schools named for him. ;)
 

5fish

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Here is a story of General Wright... Against Indians...

 

diane

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There's another s o b. I don't know if he was related to the psycho Capt Ben Wright but they were sure on board with kill 'em all - period. The colonel died strangely, by the way, when the Brother Jonathan went down off the Oregon coast. It's a famous shipwreck full of sunken gold - believe it was recovered in the late 90s - but it was the most deadly shipwreck on the West Coast for quite some time. 244 went down, 19 came out. The skipper - Capt John Wright. (Got to find out if these Wrights were related!)
 
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