"True Emancipator" Lyman Trumbull...

5fish

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This man Senator Lyman Trumbull is forgotten by history but he must be remembered for he was the "True Emancipator" of slaves... He was a contemporary of Lincoln's from the state of Illinois. I argue if it was at for his actions in the Senate the Emancipation Proclamation would never had been... Trumbull and Lincoln were in the state House of Illinois but unlike Lincoln, Trumbull worked to end slavery in the state.

Snip...

Trumbull also sponsored successful legislation to allow any free black in Illinois to register with a county clerk.62 Registration would be prima facie proof that the person was legally free.63 This provided protection from slave catchers, who often abducted free blacks by claiming that they were runaway slaves.64

Snip... with these cases mention below he ended slavery in Illinois...

2. Kinney v. Cook ................................................................. 3. Sarah v. Borders ..............................................................4. Chambers v. People ......................................................... 5. Williams v. Jarrot............................................................. 6. Jarrot v. Jarrot..........................................

As a Senator from Illinois he sponsored the Confiscation Act 1861 and later the Second Confiscation Act which force Lincoln to create his Emancipation Proclamation using the Second Confiscation Act to justify it. Even, thou Lincoln did not support the Second Confiscation Act, he sign it bit sent a letter outlining what he thought was unconstitutional about. Trumbull push for the Second Confiscation Act forced Lincoln to act...

Snip...

As the Senate met in extraordinary session from July 4 to August 6, 1861, one of the wartime measures it considered was the Confiscation Act, designed to allow the federal government to seize property, including slave property, being used to support the Confederate rebellion. The Senate passed the final bill on August 5, 1861, by a vote 24 to 11, and it was signed into law by President Lincoln the next day. Although this bill had symbolic importance, it had little effect on the rebellion or wartime negotiations.

When Congress again convened in December, Senator Lyman Trumbull of Illinois, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, proposed a more comprehensive confiscation bill. On December 2, 1861, Trumbull introduced the Confiscation Act of 1862 to allow for seizure of all Confederate property, whether or not it had been used to support the rebellion. Before long, however, Trumbull's bill stalled due to ideological differences over the issue of confiscation. Radical Republicans called for a vigorous confiscation bill to seize property and free slaves, but more conservative members worried about expanding the reach of the federal government while denying property owners their constitutional rights.


Snip... Senator Trumbull was the author of the 13th amendment.... he had a hand in the 14th...

Although Congress abolished slavery in the District of Columbia in 1862, and President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation ended the practice of slavery in rebellious states in 1863, at war’s end in 1865 the question of slavery had not been resolved at the national level. The federal government required new state constitutions in former Confederate states to include the abolition of slavery, but there was nothing to prevent states from reinstituting the practice with revised state constitutions. Senators Lyman Trumbull of Illinois, Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, and John Henderson of Missouri, sponsored resolutions for a constitutional amendment to abolish slavery nationwide. The Thirteenth Amendment—passed by the Senate on April 8, 1864; by the House on January 31, 1865; and ratified by the states on December 6, 1865—abolished slavery “within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” Congress required former Confederate states to ratify the Thirteenth Amendment as a condition of regaining federal representation.

Snip... Civil rights

The author of the Civil Rights Act of 1866 was United States Senator Lyman Trumbull.[3] Congressman James F. Wilson summarized what he considered to be the purpose of the act as follows, when he introduced the legislation in the House of Representatives:[4]

AS you can see Senator Trumbull was the True Emancipator of slaves for if not for him. I doubt Lincoln would have freed the slaves... Trumbull was one of the first defenders of the Second Amendment...

Snip... Gun rights

After leaving the Senate, Trumbull continued his fight for arms rights for working men, bringing Presser v. Illinois to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1886, and Dunne v. Illinois to the state Supreme Court in 1879. His 1894 Populist Party platform was a fiery affirmation of Second Amendment principles. Lyman Trumbull had little personal interest in firearms, and never considered the Second Amendment to be one of his major issues.

Snip... Workers rights

The Pullman Strike, Trumbull took part in defending Eugene Debs and other labor leaders of the American Railway Union, who had been convicted for violating a federal court injunction during the 1894 Pullman railroad strike. Trumbull was part of the three-member legal team, which included Clarence Darrow, when their habeas corpus case Ex parte In the Matter of Eugene V. Debs 'et al.' was heard by the US Supreme Court in 1895.[10][11]


A forgotten great of our Civil war era...
 
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5fish

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Look the NRA praises Trumbull in paragraph better than I did... I notice they left out his work for workers rights

Illinois Senator Lyman Trumbull is not well-known today, but he is one of the “Founding Sons” who transformed the nation and the Constitution before, during, and after the Civil War. He wrote the Thirteenth Amendment, the first Freedmen’s Bureau Bill, and the Civil Rights Act. He sponsored the first federal statutes which actually freed slaves. As Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee and later as a civil rights attorney, he did more to protect Second Amendment rights–including taking a test case to the U.S. Supreme Court (Presser v. Illinois)–than did any other lawyer or legislator in the century after Jefferson and Madison.

 

diane

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Lyman Trumbull, along with Thaddeus Stevens, Charles Sumner, Salmon P Chase and a couple others I can't recall at the moment are sometimes referred to as the "Founding Sons" because they did so much to transform the Constitution and the country. I'm really surprised more people don't study what these folks did during and after the war that formed the United States as a nation, not just a union. (Lyman Trumbull was also very instrumental in bringing Abraham Lincoln to the fore politically - almost single-handedly as a matter of fact!)
 
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