Separate But Vaguely Equal?

Joshism

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Was there anywhere in the country during the "separate but equal" era that made even the slightest effort to provide vaguely equal services?

For example, the standard in segregated public schools seems to have been less funding, inferior buildings and materials, worse teacher-pupil ratio, less pay for teachers, etc. The discrepancy was blatant and nothing that remotely resembled equality.
 

Leftyhunter

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Was there anywhere in the country during the "separate but equal" era that made even the slightest effort to provide vaguely equal services?

For example, the standard in segregated public schools seems to have been less funding, inferior buildings and materials, worse teacher-pupil ratio, less pay for teachers, etc. The discrepancy was blatant and nothing that remotely resembled equality.
Maybe the US Army since the Navy took very few AAs and the Marines none until WWII and then not for combat. All army troops received equal pay since 1864. There were AA officers but not many .Even during the Vietnam War over 15 years after then end of a segregated military AAs only constitutes two per cent of the officers but well over thirteen percent of the enlisted men. In 1965 AAs made up over twenty percent of the casualties since they more likely to sent to infantry units. Post Vietnam there was a great effort to improve the status of AA troops.
Leftyhunter
 

Joshism

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Even during the Vietnam War over 15 years after then end of a segregated military AAs only constitutes two per cent of the officers but well over thirteen percent of the enlisted men.
By Vietnam didn't being an officer require a college degree or OCS? Was that number out of line with the percentage of African Americans with college degrees?

It seems more like a reflection of a larger societal problem.
 

Leftyhunter

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By Vietnam didn't being an officer require a college degree or OCS? Was that number out of line with the percentage of African Americans with college degrees?

It seems more like a reflection of a larger societal problem.
Not at all there were lots of " shake and bake " leuitenants. The US Army was so short of leuitenants that a draftee who scored high enough in an IQ test could be a leuitenant plus a good Seargent could get promoted. During the Vietnam War OCS was only six weeks which why they were called shake and bake.
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5fish

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