Native American in Japan...

5fish

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Here a story about an Native American in Japan he made a stir... He met the native people of Japan the Ainu...


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Ranald MacDonald (February 3, 1824 – August 24, 1894) was the first native English-speaker to teach the English language in Japan, including educating Einosuke Moriyama, one of the chief interpreters to handle the negotiations between Commodore Perry and the Tokugawa Shogunate.

Here is this... more details while in Japan.... click the link....


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As it turned out, his "rescuers" were not Japanese, but Japan's aboriginal race of Ainu, and they took him to the village of Nozuka, in a rocky shored-area of Rishiri. They treated him kindly, but he was eventually reported to the samurai stationed at Soya, near what is today the modern city of Wakanai, at the northern tip of Hokkaido. Eventually he was shipped to Soya, interrogated, examined, and incarcerated. From there he was transported by junk along the coast to Matsumae, in southern Hokkaido, and then south all the way to Nagasaki.
 

5fish

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The Canadians claim him as theirs's. A photo of him...


snip...

“Ranald could have claimed to be a U.S. citizen, a Canadian, or a British citizen,” says Frederik L. Schodt, author of Native American in the Land of the Shogun: Ranald MacDonald and the Opening of Japan.

“I believe he told his interrogators in Japan that he was from Oregon which, in his parlance, meant everything from the Columbia River north to British Columbia, and included the state of Washington and part of Idaho, I suspect. To say that he was a Canadian is somewhat true, but a bit disingenuous, because of course when he was born modern Canada did not exist and when it did first come into being it was British.”

Whatever his nationality, however, by being the first native English teacher of Japanese interpreters, MacDonald planted a seed of internationalization in Japan that grew into a core pillar of its modernization
 
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