Harriet Beecher Stowe

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June 14, 1811 - Harriet Beecher Stowe, American author (Uncle Tom's Cabin), born in Litchfield, Connecticut (d. 1896)
 

5fish

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Harriet Beecher Stowe, American author (Uncle Tom's Cabin),
Harriet Stowe live like 17 years in Florida... She wrote a book with a Florida theme...

Snip... https://www.mandarinmuseum.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Replicating-Stowes-Experiences-In-Florida.pdf

While Harriet Beecher Stowe lived in Florida for part of seventeen years, it would be wrong to assume she lived like modern snowbirds or even as modern Floridians.


Do not know if I can make the picture bigger...
Stowe family in front of their homeA photograph attributed to C. Seaver, Jr., c. 1873 shows the home in Mandarin, Florida, of Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-96), author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Here she sits with her husband and daughters. Steamers carried crowds of visitors to this house, situated within shouting distance of the landing pier. In 1873, Mrs. Stowe published Palmetto Leaves, a book of letters to women friends about her life in north Florida.

SNIP... This article list a who's who of the late 19th century that visited "Sliver Springs", like MS. Lincoln, the The Grant's. Ms. Stowe and ect...

LINK: https://www.ocala.com/article/LK/20100425/News/604236945/OS

Harriet Beecher Stowe, the famous author of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” was tempted to take the trip while on a visit to Palatka, but could not overcome her fears when she saw the condition of one of the steamboats, the Ocklawaha, at the dock.
The long, low sides of the boat had been scarred by trees and bushes along the banks. There was no glass in the windows, only wooden shutters, which led to speculation about the discomfort caused by mosquitoes and extreme heat. It took awhile for Stowe to make up her mind.
Sometime later, after reading what others had to say about it, she finally made the trip. Writing about her adventure, she said there was nothing in the world comparable to it.


Ship,,, She promote the state... the below link tales how Stowe promoted Florida to Northern Progressive...

LINK: https://myfloridahistory.org/frontiers/article/70

Stowe began spending her winters in Mandarin, Florida, shortly after the Civil War ended. Her home was on the St. Johns River where she could sit on her porch and enjoy the natural environment. Stowe also traveled to places such as Silver Springs, St. Augustine, and Tallahassee, and wrote about her experiences.
In 1873, some of Stowe’s descriptive and colorful “tourist articles” were published in the book “Palmetto Leaves.” More recently, a collection of Stowe’s fascinating vignettes of Florida life not included in “Palmetto Leaves” has been published as the book “Calling Yankees to Florida: Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Forgotten Tourist Articles.”

Snip...

Stowe became actively involved in Florida’s new tourism industry of the late 1800s. The steamship companies that brought tourists down the river paid the famous writer to stand on her porch and wave to their passengers.
Stowe’s book “Palmetto Leaves” consists of a series of articles written in the year 1872. She wrote many articles both before and after that year, and a selection of those articles has been assembled in the book “Calling Yankees to Florida,” edited by John T. Foster Jr. and Sarah Whitmer Foster.
The Foster’s believe that Stowe had a hidden agenda in writing about the natural wonders of Florida for northerners suffering through snowy winters. In addition to stimulating tourism, the Foster’s think that Stowe was trying to attract a more progressive voting block to Florida to lead the state from the Old South into a new era.
 

5fish

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It looks like Harriet Stowe lived in Cincinnati for years as will. It seem she started her writing career there...

LINK:https://www.historynet.com/harriet-beecher-stowe

In 1826, the Beechers moved from Litchfield to Boston, Massachusetts, where Lyman was a minister at the Hanover Church. As a Calvinist preaching against the evils of Unitarianism in the religious center of the Unitarian movement, he was not as successful as he had hoped. He moved his family again in 1834, this time to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church of Cincinnati and president of the Lane Theological Seminary of Cincinnati. By moving to the western frontier, Lyman would train preachers at the seminary and use them to spread Protestantism—and his anti-Catholicism views—in the West.
While in Cincinnati many members of the Beecher family, including Harriet, joined the Semi-Colon Club, a literary and social salon that included future Chief Justice of the Supreme Court Salmon P. Chase, Judge James Hall, who was editor of Western Monthly Magazine, and other prominent members of Cincinnati’s intellectual society. They read and critiqued each other’s writing and debated social issues, including slavery.
In 1836, Harriet married widowed clergyman Calvin Ellis Stowe, a professor at her father’s theological seminary. They had seven children between 1836 and 1850. During their time in Cincinnati, the Stowes met and talked with slaves that had escaped to Ohio from neighboring Kentucky and Virginia. They were friends with abolitionists who participated in the Underground Railroad, and Harriet visited Kentucky, where she saw the impact of slavery first-hand.
In 1839, the Stowes hired a servant girl from Kentucky, who by the laws of Ohio was free since her mistress had brought her and allowed her to stay in Cincinnati. However, a few months later, they learned that the girl’s master was in town looking for her and could legally, by any means, seize her and return her to slavery in Kentucky. One night, Professor Stowe and his brother-in-law, Henry Ward Beecher, armed themselves and drove the girl in a covered wagon by unfrequented roads into the country to a trusted friend’s home. This incident became the basis of the fugitives’ escape in Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
Married life and motherhood did not put a damper on Harriet’s literary career, which had started before her marriage. Calvin, active in public education, was very supportive of her writing and her involvement in public affairs. In 1833, she had co-authored A Primary Geography for Children with her sister Catharine. In 1834, Harriet won a writing contest in the Western Monthly Magazine and began writing articles, essays, and stories for it and, over the course of her life-long writing career, other publications including The Atlantic Monthly, New York Evangelist, the Independent, and the Christian Union. She published a short story collection, The New England Sketches, in 1835. In 1843 she published her first novel, The Mayflower, and published roughly a book a year for the ensuing 30 years.


Following a cholera outbreak in 1849 that took the life of their youngest son, Samuel Charles, known as Charley, the Stowes moved to Brunswick, Maine, where Calvin was a professor at Bowdoin College, his alma mater. Harriet gave birth to their last child, Charles Edward, on July 8, 1850.
 
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