Civil Rights Are Going To Change...

5fish

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Our Supreme Court is going to hear a case that could change Civil Right laws for decades...

Link:https://content.next.westlaw.com/Document/I0f9fc015ef0811e28578f7ccc38dcbee/View/FullText.html?transitionType=Default&contextData=(sc.Default)&firstPage=true&bhcp=1

Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act of 1866 (Section 1981) A federal law prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, and ethnicity when making and enforcing contracts. ... It does not prohibit discrimination on the basis of any other protected class.

Article: https://deadline.com/2019/09/comcast-naacp-supreme-court-discrimination-battle-byron-allen-urban-league-1202747067/

“Comcast – the second largest broadcasting and cable television company in the world – is poised to take an unprecedented step,” the NAACP added. “Because of a dispute with a Black businessman, the company has urged the Supreme Court to roll back the crucial protections of one of the nation’s oldest civil rights laws, Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act of 1866.”

Snip...

Here is the NAACP statement:

In several weeks, the Supreme Court will hear one of the most important civil rights cases to come before it this term. Comcast – the second largest broadcasting and cable television company in the world – is poised to take an unprecedented step. Because of a dispute with a Black businessman, the company has urged the Supreme Court to roll back the crucial protections of one of the nation’s oldest civil rights laws, Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act of 1866.

For more than a century, Section 1981 has been used as an important tool to combat race discrimination, particularly for employment discrimination claimants. Throughout the NAACP’s history, standard-bearers of justice like Thurgood Marshall have harnessed the power of Section 1981 to fight various forms of discrimination. Yet now, in a situation that has become all too familiar during this era, an upcoming Supreme Court decision has the potential to reject these lessons of history by rolling back the clock on basic civil rights.

Although the NAACP takes no position on the underlying dispute, we have decided to take the lead on this issue. We urge Comcast to cease its attack on Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act of 1866; a bedrock civil rights statute that has been in place for more than 150 years.


Snip... https://naacp.org/comcast/

Comcast, the largest U.S. cable provider, is urging the Supreme Court to roll back vital protections in one of the country’s longest-standing civil rights laws—Section 1981. With the support of the Trump administration, Comcast is attempting to turn back the clock on civil rights, making it harder for Black businesses and contractors to challenge racial discrimination under a law that has been around since 1866.

Black workers and businesses are already burdened by the intentional discrimination in their day to day lives; weakening one of the primary vehicles for challenging that discrimination is simply unconscionable

 

5fish

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Here is Trump's directed attacks on Civil and Human rights from his office...


Snip... 2017

On February 21, the Department of Homeland Security issued a memo updating immigration enforcement guidance, massively expanding the number of people subject to detention and deportation. The guidance drastically increased the use of expedited removal and essentially eliminated the priorities for deportation.

Snip... 2017

On August 29, the administration halted an EEOC rule that required large companies to disclose what they pay employees by sex, race, and ethnicity – a rule that was intended to remedy the unequal pay that remains rampant in the American workplace.

Snip...
 

Kirk's Raider's

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Our Supreme Court is going to hear a case that could change Civil Right laws for decades...

Link:https://content.next.westlaw.com/Document/I0f9fc015ef0811e28578f7ccc38dcbee/View/FullText.html?transitionType=Default&contextData=(sc.Default)&firstPage=true&bhcp=1

Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act of 1866 (Section 1981) A federal law prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, and ethnicity when making and enforcing contracts. ... It does not prohibit discrimination on the basis of any other protected class.

Article: https://deadline.com/2019/09/comcast-naacp-supreme-court-discrimination-battle-byron-allen-urban-league-1202747067/

“Comcast – the second largest broadcasting and cable television company in the world – is poised to take an unprecedented step,” the NAACP added. “Because of a dispute with a Black businessman, the company has urged the Supreme Court to roll back the crucial protections of one of the nation’s oldest civil rights laws, Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act of 1866.”

Snip...

Here is the NAACP statement:

In several weeks, the Supreme Court will hear one of the most important civil rights cases to come before it this term. Comcast – the second largest broadcasting and cable television company in the world – is poised to take an unprecedented step. Because of a dispute with a Black businessman, the company has urged the Supreme Court to roll back the crucial protections of one of the nation’s oldest civil rights laws, Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act of 1866.

For more than a century, Section 1981 has been used as an important tool to combat race discrimination, particularly for employment discrimination claimants. Throughout the NAACP’s history, standard-bearers of justice like Thurgood Marshall have harnessed the power of Section 1981 to fight various forms of discrimination. Yet now, in a situation that has become all too familiar during this era, an upcoming Supreme Court decision has the potential to reject these lessons of history by rolling back the clock on basic civil rights.

Although the NAACP takes no position on the underlying dispute, we have decided to take the lead on this issue. We urge Comcast to cease its attack on Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act of 1866; a bedrock civil rights statute that has been in place for more than 150 years.


Snip... https://naacp.org/comcast/

Comcast, the largest U.S. cable provider, is urging the Supreme Court to roll back vital protections in one of the country’s longest-standing civil rights laws—Section 1981. With the support of the Trump administration, Comcast is attempting to turn back the clock on civil rights, making it harder for Black businesses and contractors to challenge racial discrimination under a law that has been around since 1866.

Black workers and businesses are already burdened by the intentional discrimination in their day to day lives; weakening one of the primary vehicles for challenging that discrimination is simply unconscionable
Not sure what the above case is about after reading the links. If Comcast doesn't want to buy content from a minority owned studio how is that racial discrimination! As long has Comcast claims said content is not profitable since not enough people will watch hence insufficient add revenue. Am I missing something?
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5fish

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Not sure what the above case is about after reading the links
Here is a link: explains the case a little better... may have to refresh to get pass the ad black...


  • Comcast looked poised for victory during arguments over a $20 billion racial discrimination case brought by former comedian Byron Allen.
  • The win may not be final. The justices suggested they may erase the company’s defeat before a lower court, but give Allen another shot to bring his case.
  • The question before the Supreme Court was not whether Allen had been discriminated against. Instead, it concerned the reach of the 1866 Civil Rights Act, which guarantees black and white citizens the equal right to make and enforce contracts.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of Allen,
rejecting the decision of a federal district judge who dismissed the complaint. Conservative and liberal justices alike expressed deep skepticism of the 9th Circuit’s reasoning on Wednesday.

Arguments were highly technical. They concerned at which stage in the legal process which standard should apply. Erwin Chemerinsky, Allen’s attorney, conceded that Allen should have to meet the stricter standard to ultimately win his case. But he said that the lower bar should apply when a case is first brought.

The NAACP wrote in a brief in the matter that “Comcast’s arguments would, in many cases, impose an impossible pleading burden on victims of discrimination.
 

Kirk's Raider's

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Here is a link: explains the case a little better... may have to refresh to get pass the ad black...


  • Comcast looked poised for victory during arguments over a $20 billion racial discrimination case brought by former comedian Byron Allen.
  • The win may not be final. The justices suggested they may erase the company’s defeat before a lower court, but give Allen another shot to bring his case.
  • The question before the Supreme Court was not whether Allen had been discriminated against. Instead, it concerned the reach of the 1866 Civil Rights Act, which guarantees black and white citizens the equal right to make and enforce contracts.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of Allen, rejecting the decision of a federal district judge who dismissed the complaint. Conservative and liberal justices alike expressed deep skepticism of the 9th Circuit’s reasoning on Wednesday.

Arguments were highly technical. They concerned at which stage in the legal process which standard should apply. Erwin Chemerinsky, Allen’s attorney, conceded that Allen should have to meet the stricter standard to ultimately win his case. But he said that the lower bar should apply when a case is first brought.

The NAACP wrote in a brief in the matter that “Comcast’s arguments would, in many cases, impose an impossible pleading burden on victims of discrimination.
Still not seeing racial discrimination. Isn't there a black owned cable TV networkI remember BET ? Didn't BET merge with another network?
If Comcast had a much lower percentage of black workers then it's share of the US population which is approximately 13% then there might be something to racial discrimination.
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