Canadian Slavery....

5fish

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I Northern Brother nation had slavery as we had slavery her in America. It ended in the 1830's while it continued in America...


Snip...


The colony of New France, founded in the early 1600s, was the first major settlement in what is now Canada. Slavery was a common practice in the territory. When New France was conquered by the British in 1759, records revealed that approximately 3,600 enslaved people had lived in the settlement since its beginnings.2 The vast majority of them were Indigenous (often called Panis3), but Black enslaved people were also present because of the transatlantic slave trade.

The link will have much more details on Canadian Slavery....
 

5fish

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Canadian Founding Fathers many were slavers...


Canada's towns, parks and universities abound with statues and street signs that have immortalized our "founding fathers." But there is no sign of the men, women and children that some of these powerful men enslaved.

snip...

Every year the Black Coalition of Quebec organizes a grim pilgrimage to an unmarked grave. About an hour from Montreal outside the village of Saint Armand, close to a dozen slaves are said to be buried near a large whale-shaped boulder.

snip...

What Nelson calls our "strategic ignorance," harks all the way back to slave-owners themselves, whose selective diaries were replete with euphemisms like "servants" and extended family.
 

5fish

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Those Canadians...

Here is from the link...

The first documented black slave arrived in Quebec city in 1628, just twenty years after the founding of New France. The boy, from Madagascar, was given the name Olivier Le Jeune. He was sold by a British commander to a French clerk.

When Britain took over New France, about 7 per cent of the colony was enslaved, or around 4,000 out of a population of 60,000. Two-thirds were indigenous slaves, known as Panis, and the other third African, who cost twice as much and were a status symbol. The British did not set them free.

Snip,... Vermont underground railroad...

Unlike our American cousins, Canada did not itself end its slavery ― in fact, in 1777 slaves began fleeing Canada for Vermont, which had just abolished slavery. It took Britain to finally outlaw the practice across their entire empire in 1834.
 

byron ed

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Not that JK and two others here will be able to relate to this response; but... An important take-away from the history of North American slavery -- as practiced by Euros in all parts of the continent including Canada -- is that only one segment of the continent still retained and promoted the legal practice of slavery by the mid-19th century, and only that one segment practiced the most heinous form of slavery -- systematic chattel slavery -- including self-propagation (meaning many slaves and their ancestors, if not most, have white bloodlines). Also it was only that one segment that practiced slavery at such an immense scale, their very economy completely reliant on slave labor to the exclusion of industry as adopted by the Northern sections.

That particular segment of course is the Slave South in the U.S., and thereby the Confederacy.

It is that unique history of that section that defies the Lost Cause / Lost Cause Lite / Confederate apologist promotion (myth) that slavery in the Southern U.S. was no worse than slavery as practiced anywhere else on the continent, that slavery was endemic in the Northern states from the very founding of the U.S. (and here we find even in colonial Canada). If that idea can be sold, it enables the selling of the idea that the Civil War wasn't about slavery because slavery had been practiced everywhere on the continent including the Northern U.S (and Canada).

The key phrase though, as we all know, is the phrase "had been practiced," a phrase that Lost Cause / Lost Cause Lite / Confederate apologists avoid using because it blows their gig. In the same way they will never on their own bring up the immense of difference in the scale of slavery as practiced in the Southern U.S. as compared to anywhere else on the Continent.*



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(* keeping in mind we're only comparing North American slavery, not Middle or south American slavery. It's true enough that the scale of slavery in South America was quite comparable to that of slavery in the Southern U.S., But that's for another thread).
 
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Jim Klag

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Not that JK and two others here will be able to relate to this response; but... An important take-away from the history of North American slavery -- as practiced by Euros in all parts of the continent including Canada -- is that only one segment of the continent still retained and promoted the legal practice of slavery by the mid-19th century, and only that one segment practiced the most heinous form of slavery -- systematic chattel slavery -- including self-propagation (meaning many slaves and their ancestors, if not most, have white bloodlines). Also it was only that one segment that practiced slavery at such an immense scale, their very economy completely reliant on slave labor to the exclusion of industry as adopted by the Northern sections.

That particular segment of course is the Slave South in the U.S., and thereby the Confederacy.

It is that unique history of that section that defies the Lost Cause / Lost Cause Lite / Confederate apologist promotion (myth) that slavery in the Southern U.S. was no worse than slavery as practiced anywhere else on the continent, that slavery was endemic in the Northern states from the very founding of the U.S. (and here we find even in colonial Canada). If that idea can be sold, it enables the selling of the idea that the Civil War wasn't about slavery because slavery had been practiced everywhere on the continent including the Northern U.S (and Canada).

The key phrase though, as we all know, is the phrase "had been practiced," a phrase that Lost Cause / Lost Cause Lite / Confederate apologists avoid using because it blows their gig. In the same way they will never on their own bring up the immense of difference in the scale of slavery as practiced in the Southern U.S. as compared to anywhere else on the Continent.*



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(* keeping in mind we're only comparing North American slavery, not Middle or south American slavery. It's true enough that the scale of slavery in South America was quite comparable to that of slavery in the Southern U.S., But that's for another thread).
Your arrogance is breathtaking. Why would I and others not be able to relate to your "important takeaway . . .?" Only @byron ed has insight into the mid-nineteenth century in America? Only @byron ed is capable of unraveling the intracacies of slavery in the Americas? You are better not to post at all than to post tripe. Meh.
 

byron ed

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...Why would I and others not be able to relate to your "important takeaway . . .?"
Because of the history here. For a few here if there's something they didn't themselves originate or have thought about before, it never existed.

Some are just not "sit-around-the-cracker-barrel" types.
 

byron ed

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...Only [byron ed] has insight into the mid-nineteenth century in America? Only [byron ed] is capable of unraveling the intracacies of slavery in the Americas?...
If those are sincere questions, then "no" and "no."

...better not to post at all than to post tripe...
I agree.

So that settled; if after all you do relate to my insights about North American slavery and Lost Cause attempts to co-opt the history of it, just go ahead and comment. Push-back respected, complete sentences appreciated.
 

Jim Klag

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Because of the history here. For a few here if there's something they didn't themselves originate or have thought about before, it never existed.

Some are just not "sit-around-the-cracker-barrel" types.
Your personal insult is duly noted, @byron ed. Don't ever do it again whether using my name or just my initials.
 

O' Be Joyful

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Shit...both of youse should sit around the proverbial Cracker Barrel/box and let it...go.

Pry off the top of a hogshead or pull some nails elsewhere.
 

rittmeister

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Because of the history here. For a few here if there's something they didn't themselves originate or have thought about before, it never existed.

Some are just not "sit-around-the-cracker-barrel" types.
... and a certain @byron ed is their self proclaimed leader
 

byron ed

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Your personal insult is duly noted, [byron ed]. Don't ever do it again whether using my name or just my initials.
It's quite acrobatic to find a personal insult in "Some are just not 'sit-around-the-cracker-barrel' types," but here we are.

You know, at times folks here are going to be interested in things that you aren't interested in. My preface was not intended to disrespect you; rather it was a courtesy to you and others of your approach. It was basically granting permission that none of y'all needed to have read it, let alone respond to it, as in fact y'all do not relate to that kind of discourse *

Now as to your request (threat?), there's nothing at all improper about referencing screen names in responses. You yourself do it often and typically. (Posts are public here so there's no disclaiming that). Still, if going forward you can demonstrate that you'll desist from using my screen name in your responses I will respond in kind, in deference to your request.

But to be clear, outside of that we all reserve the option to continue citing screen names, not only because there's nothing wrong with it but in consideration of all other participants that we don't needlessly spin them into some kind of silly guessing game as to who said what.


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* a reasoned response to the OP exploring the history of slavery in North America, including Canada, and the attempt of Lost Cause et. al. to co-opt that history for it's own purposes.
 
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byron ed

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... and a certain @byron ed is their self proclaimed leader
Not that. There's no leader of discussions around the ol' cracker barrel. As with discussions around the campfire, folks just blurt out whatever it is they have to say. Perhaps it's more of an American culture thing than a Euro culture thing.
 

byron ed

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S--t...both of youse should sit around the proverbial Cracker Barrel/box and let it...go...
Naughty word aside, we're both making points that are of interest to the whole forum, at least until it isn't -- and that hasn't happened as yet.
 

rittmeister

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Naughty word aside, we're both making points that are of interest to the whole forum, at least until it isn't -- and that hasn't happened as yet.
there are officially no naughty words around here - may be there will be if it becomes too much, so please refrain from using a crowbar to introduce them cop.gif
 

rittmeister

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Not that. There's no leader of discussions around the ol' cracker barrel. As with discussions around the campfire, folks just blurt out whatever it is they have to say. Perhaps it's more of an American culture thing than a Euro culture thing.
maybe i should have used obvious champion instead of self proclaimed leader, but then i'm not wolf blitzer
 

Jim Klag

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Not that JK and two others here will be able to relate to this response; but... An important take-away from the history of North American slavery -- as practiced by Euros in all parts of the continent including Canada -- is that only one segment of the continent still retained and promoted the legal practice of slavery by the mid-19th century, and only that one segment practiced the most heinous form of slavery -- systematic chattel slavery -- including self-propagation (meaning many slaves and their ancestors, if not most, have white bloodlines). Also it was only that one segment that practiced slavery at such an immense scale, their very economy completely reliant on slave labor to the exclusion of industry as adopted by the Northern sections.

That particular segment of course is the Slave South in the U.S., and thereby the Confederacy.

It is that unique history of that section that defies the Lost Cause / Lost Cause Lite / Confederate apologist promotion (myth) that slavery in the Southern U.S. was no worse than slavery as practiced anywhere else on the continent, that slavery was endemic in the Northern states from the very founding of the U.S. (and here we find even in colonial Canada). If that idea can be sold, it enables the selling of the idea that the Civil War wasn't about slavery because slavery had been practiced everywhere on the continent including the Northern U.S (and Canada).

The key phrase though, as we all know, is the phrase "had been practiced," a phrase that Lost Cause / Lost Cause Lite / Confederate apologists avoid using because it blows their gig. In the same way they will never on their own bring up the immense of difference in the scale of slavery as practiced in the Southern U.S. as compared to anywhere else on the Continent.*



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(* keeping in mind we're only comparing North American slavery, not Middle or south American slavery. It's true enough that the scale of slavery in South America was quite comparable to that of slavery in the Southern U.S., But that's for another thread).
@byron ed what, exactly, is the purpose of the first sentence in the cited post?
 

Jim Klag

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@byron ed I am still waiting for a response to my previous post. Did you think I would just go away?
 
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